A lowest lowest Farewell To Arms sale

A lowest lowest Farewell To Arms sale

A lowest lowest Farewell To Arms sale
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Product Description

Ernest Hemingway’s classic novel of love during wartime.

Written when Ernest Hemingway was thirty years old and lauded as the best American novel to emerge from World War I, A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Set against the looming horrors of the battlefield, this gripping, semiautobiographical work captures the harsh realities of war and the pain of lovers caught in its inexorable sweep.

Hemingway famously rewrote the ending to A Farewell to Arms thirty-nine times to get the words right. A classic novel of love during wartime, “ A Farewell to Arms stands, more than eighty years after its first appearance, as a towering ornament of American literature” ( The Washington Times).

Amazon.com Review

As a youth of 18, Ernest Hemingway was eager to fight in the Great War. Poor vision kept him out of the army, so he joined the ambulance corps instead and was sent to France. Then he transferred to Italy where he became the first American wounded in that country during World War I. Hemingway came out of the European battlefields with a medal for valor and a wealth of experience that he would, 10 years later, spin into literary gold with A Farewell to Arms. This is the story of Lieutenant Henry, an American, and Catherine Barkley, a British nurse. The two meet in Italy, and almost immediately Hemingway sets up the central tension of the novel: the tenuous nature of love in a time of war. During their first encounter, Catherine tells Henry about her fiancé of eight years who had been killed the year before in the Somme. Explaining why she hadn''t married him, she says she was afraid marriage would be bad for him, then admits:

I wanted to do something for him. You see, I didn''t care about the other thing and he could have had it all. He could have had anything he wanted if I would have known. I would have married him or anything. I know all about it now. But then he wanted to go to war and I didn''t know.
The two begin an affair, with Henry quite convinced that he "did not love Catherine Barkley nor had any idea of loving her. This was a game, like bridge, in which you said things instead of playing cards." Soon enough, however, the game turns serious for both of them and ultimately Henry ends up deserting to be with Catherine.

Hemingway was not known for either unbridled optimism or happy endings, and A Farewell to Arms, like his other novels (For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Sun Also Rises, and To Have and Have Not), offers neither. What it does provide is an unblinking portrayal of men and women behaving with grace under pressure, both physical and psychological, and somehow finding the courage to go on in the face of certain loss. --Alix Wilber

From Library Journal

These dual Hemingways are the latest volumes in the Scribner Paperback Fiction series (Classic Returns, February 15, p. 187). They offer quality trade size editions, featuring attractive covers and easily readable type size. Two of the greats.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

“I think  A Farewell to Arms is Hemingway''s greatest novel, the truest. It’s also heartbreaking.”
—Edna O’Brien

“We can’t seem to stop using a certain kind of elevated, heroic language about war and it is our duty always to puncture it. No one has ever done that as eloquently as Hemingway, through the accumulating weight of his sentences, and the emotional clarity, the disgust and also the reverence for what has been done.” 
—Tobias Wolff

About the Author

Ernest Hemingway did more to change the style of English prose than any other writer of his time. Publication of  The Sun Also Rises and  A Farewell to Arms immediately established Hemingway as one of the greatest literary lights of the twentieth century. His classic novel  The Old Man and the Sea won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953. Hemingway was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954. His life and accomplishments are explored in-depth in the PBS documentary film from Ken Burns and Lynn Novick,  Hemingway. Known for his larger-than-life personality and his passions for bullfighting, fishing, and big-game hunting, he died in Ketchum, Idaho on July 2, 1961. 

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One

In the late summer of that year we lived in a house in a village that looked across the river and the plain to the mountains. In the bed of the river there were pebbles and boulders, dry and white in the sun, and the water was clear and swiftly moving and blue in the channels. Troops went by the house and down the road and the dust they raised powdered the leaves of the trees. The trunks of the trees too were dusty and the leaves fell early that year and we saw the troops marching along the road and the dust rising and leaves, stirred by the breeze, falling and the soldiers marching and afterward the road bare and white except for the leaves.

The plain was rich with crops; there were many orchards of fruit trees and beyond the plain the mountains were brown and bare. There was fighting in the mountains and at night we could see the flashes from the artillery. In the dark it was like summer lightning, but the nights were cool and there was not the feeling of a storm coming.

Sometimes in the dark we heard the troops marching under the window and guns going past pulled by motor-tractors. There was much traffic at night and many mules on the roads with boxes of ammunition on each side of their pack-saddles and gray motor trucks that carried men, and other trucks with loads covered with canvas that moved slower in the traffic. There were big guns too that passed in the day drawn by tractors, the long barrels of the guns covered with green branches and green leafy branches and vines laid over the tractors. To the north we could look across a valley and see a forest of chestnut trees and behind it another mountain on this side of the river. There was fighting for that mountain too, but it was not successful, and in the fall when the rains came the leaves all fell from the chestnut trees and the branches were bare and the trunks black with rain. The vineyards were thin and bare-branched too and all the country wet and brown and dead with the autumn. There were mists over the river and clouds on the mountain and the trucks splashed mud on the road and the troops were muddy and wet in their capes; their rifles were wet and under their capes the two leather cartridge-boxes on the front of the belts, gray leather boxes heavy with the packs of clips of thin, long 6.5 mm. cartridges, bulged forward under the capes so that the men, passing on the road, marched as though they were six months gone with child.

There were small gray motor cars that passed going very fast; usually there was an officer on the seat with the driver and more officers in the back seat. They splashed more mud than the camions even and if one of the officers in the back was very small and sitting between two generals, he himself so small that you could not see his face but only the top of his cap and his narrow back, and if the car went especially fast it was probably the King. He lived in Udine and came out in this way nearly every day to see how things were going, and things went very badly.

At the start of the winter came the permanent rain and with the rain came the cholera. But it was checked and in the end only seven thousand died of it in the army.

Copyright © 1929 by Charles Scribner''s Sons

Copyright renewed 1957 © by Ernest Hemmingway

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Customer reviews

4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
3,874 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Joseph Sciuto
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Perfect Novel
Reviewed in the United States on September 19, 2018
Ernest Hemingway''s "A Farewell to Arms" is one of the books I have re-read the most throughout my life, along with Hemingway''s "The Sun Also Rises," Conrad''s "Heart of Darkness" and "Under Western Eyes" and Joyce''s "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man." In many ways, it... See more
Ernest Hemingway''s "A Farewell to Arms" is one of the books I have re-read the most throughout my life, along with Hemingway''s "The Sun Also Rises," Conrad''s "Heart of Darkness" and "Under Western Eyes" and Joyce''s "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man." In many ways, it is to me, as ''perfect'' as any novel I have ever read. Its structure is flawless, the characters unforgettable, and the writing is bold and terse, hard and yielding all at the same time. I never fail to learn something new each time I read this wonderful work of art. If I was to teach a class on how to write a novel, this would be the book I would assign to my class.

The Hemingway Library Edition of "A Farewell to Arms" I received as a gift also came with an Appendix that included the thirty-nine other endings Hemingway considered for the novel. Many are quite telling and a two were used in the serialized versions that appeared in Scribner magazines before the actual publication of the book. I simply love this book.
67 people found this helpful
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Unconnected Bliss
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Too long
Reviewed in the United States on March 6, 2021
This book is a lot longer than the Dr Suess books that I normally read. I wish the author hadn''t been feeling so full of himself when he went to write this, he obviously had a lot to get off of his chest. I am trying to get done reading this so I can go out on a date with a... See more
This book is a lot longer than the Dr Suess books that I normally read. I wish the author hadn''t been feeling so full of himself when he went to write this, he obviously had a lot to get off of his chest. I am trying to get done reading this so I can go out on a date with a girl that I told I had already read it, and it''s her favorite book. She keeps asking me when we can go out and if I can''t ever get to the end of this book then I''m guessing that will be like in July or something? Why does this book have to be so long? I think that it really could have been much shorter.
21 people found this helpful
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Arion W
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I Read Hemingway So Give Me A Cookie
Reviewed in the United States on July 24, 2020
I am beginning to realize that a good chunk of classic novels aren’t that great. This is one of them. While there were some passages that were lovely, the rest of the story seemed void of anything substantial. War is horrible, the toll it takes on people and civilization as... See more
I am beginning to realize that a good chunk of classic novels aren’t that great. This is one of them. While there were some passages that were lovely, the rest of the story seemed void of anything substantial. War is horrible, the toll it takes on people and civilization as a whole even worse, but I didn’t get that from reading this book. I didn’t care about any of the characters and had to push myself through to finish. I wish I could say that I loved it because Hemingway is considered one of the best novelists of all time but I honestly do not understand why.
29 people found this helpful
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Humble
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Awful and ponderous
Reviewed in the United States on June 27, 2019
After years of hearing how Hemingway was a genius and a writer that brought the truth of war to readers, this was a huge disappointment. Ponderous, constant use of unintelligible slang, endless useless conversations. I tried slogging through this mess, but finally gave up... See more
After years of hearing how Hemingway was a genius and a writer that brought the truth of war to readers, this was a huge disappointment. Ponderous, constant use of unintelligible slang, endless useless conversations. I tried slogging through this mess, but finally gave up and sought better books.
26 people found this helpful
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Edwin Relf
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not a nice man
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2020
I wanted to read something more spare than the flowery overwritten novels of some recent writers. SPARE! Whew! Narry an adjective nor avderb to be seen. That didn''t speed up the read though. The result is like static on bad radio reception. The story lacked colour and... See more
I wanted to read something more spare than the flowery overwritten novels of some recent writers. SPARE! Whew! Narry an adjective nor avderb to be seen. That didn''t speed up the read though. The result is like static on bad radio reception. The story lacked colour and sensuality but that might be down to the male central character - a self-centered United Statesian male who lacked some human qualities.
8 people found this helpful
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Mike Morrison
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s Hemingway. Take it or leave it.
Reviewed in the United States on March 3, 2020
The Kindle transfer works fine, and if you like Hemingway, or, at least, can stand it, this will work for you. It also adds some interesting features, such as notes and alternate endings and a couple of pithy insights from family members and others. All of this helps Dear... See more
The Kindle transfer works fine, and if you like Hemingway, or, at least, can stand it, this will work for you. It also adds some interesting features, such as notes and alternate endings and a couple of pithy insights from family members and others. All of this helps Dear Reader better understand the work itself.

The story itself, for me, kind of meanders, and I find the ending a cop out. I know those who revere Hemingway think he is being sardonic, with lots of deliberate underlying subtext and philosophy. To me, it feels like he just couldn''t think of a better ending, so he did this and just stopped writing.

As I said: It''s Hemingway. If you like it, this edition adds insight and makes the work more meaningful.
7 people found this helpful
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Musicman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book edition with extras not included in other editions.
Reviewed in the United States on May 15, 2021
Interesting book. My father was a huge Hemingway fan and we even had a German Sheperd named Ernest Hemingway. I knew bits and pieces of the writer thru my father, but after watching the Ken Burns series last month, I decided to buy a book. I had no idea with which book to... See more
Interesting book. My father was a huge Hemingway fan and we even had a German Sheperd named Ernest Hemingway. I knew bits and pieces of the writer thru my father, but after watching the Ken Burns series last month, I decided to buy a book. I had no idea with which book to buy. Apparently this book is called "The Hemingway Library Edition", and the book I bought is "A Farewell to Arms". With this edition, it has the author''s introduction, a foreward by Patrick Hemingway, and an introduction by Sean Hemingway, nice bonuses. This book also includes copies of Hemingway''s early drafts, which I really like.
The book is really good and I plan on buying more of his library editions as well.
NOTE: I have to re~read some of Hemingway''s sentences more than once because his writing style is different. Maybe because it is an old way of constructing sentences? Not sure. He writes in short sentences and uses commas a lot. I am hoping his books will improve my own writing, such my Outlook messages to my project teams at work. I could use improvements.
2 people found this helpful
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Gordon S.
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I’m not one for fiction, so...
Reviewed in the United States on May 10, 2020
I’m not one for fiction, so, meh... is my response to one of America’s greatest authors. A love story. A light expose of war time historical fiction. A couple insightful passages on the human condition. A lot of mundane and trite dialogue. A tragic ending. Ok. I’ll... See more
I’m not one for fiction, so, meh... is my response to one of America’s greatest authors. A love story. A light expose of war time historical fiction. A couple insightful passages on the human condition. A lot of mundane and trite dialogue. A tragic ending. Ok.
I’ll say I was more impressed in the format of this book which included singer of his alternative ending drafts. It gave me a better perspective on Hemingway’s strive for efficiency in his word choice and some insight into his intention for this story. Oddly, the story itself doesn’t clarify that intention - only in reading the alternative drafts can you know his intention.
A farewell to arms... early in the book I was leaning to thinking this was a critique of war. A hopeful commentary that we will leave war behind us. But sadly, no, only lightly addressed. Instead, especially after considering some of his alternative titles, I think it simply refers to the tragedy of this story. The arms of his lover, and subtly perhaps to the passage of any meaning in life. Everything is wonderful. And then it ends.
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Top reviews from other countries

Martin Jones
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good Bad Writing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 1, 2018
Rules become more demanding in times of trouble. There is a clearer and more unforgiving sense of good guys and bad guys, right and wrong. Ironically, however, times of trouble can also see civilised rules of behaviour torn apart. A Farewell to Arms tells a story set in...See more
Rules become more demanding in times of trouble. There is a clearer and more unforgiving sense of good guys and bad guys, right and wrong. Ironically, however, times of trouble can also see civilised rules of behaviour torn apart. A Farewell to Arms tells a story set in World War One. An American named Frederick Henry joins the Italian army as an ambulance driver. Caught in a chaotic retreat, he witnesses summary and arbitrary justice meted out by military policemen. Realising his own side is as lethal as the enemy, Henry deserts. The story then follows Henry through his desperate escape bid. The writing of Henry’s story mirrors the breaking of rules in his life. As a narrator, Frederick Henry ignores all the civilised writing rules drummed into the aspiring author - repeated words, frequent adverbs, passive voice, limited vocabulary, confusing sentences, liberal use of intensifiers such as “very”, which intensify weak adjectives such as “nice”. And yet the rules of good writing lurk, the demanding sense that these words are shaped. This “bad” writing aspires to excellence. In the famous opening paragraph, Hemingway uses repeated words like “the” to give rhythm, as in a spoken conversation. The use of “the” also serves to conduct us into Henry’s world, where mountains he describes are “the” mountains which narrator and reader both seem to be looking at, rather than any old range of hills introduced to us at the beginning of a story. From then on every untutored line has a hidden quality. Take, for example, the following exchange: “I went everywhere. Milan, Florence, Rome, Naples, Villa San Giovanni, Messina, Taormina——” “You talk like a time-table. Did you have any beautiful adventures?” “Yes.” “Where?” “Milano, Firenze, Roma, Napoli——” A timetable might not seem like great writing, but there is undeniable beauty in simple place names. Place names, for example, are hugely influential in song writing, the music journalist Nick Coleman suggesting that apart from love, “pop is better on cities than anything else.” The writing of A Farewell to Arms might have the literary quality of a timetable, but that doesn’t mean it can’t aspire to the sort of poetry informing thousands of songs. A Farewell to Arms is a perfect combination of form and content, of what is said and how it is said. As in James M. Cain’s The Postman Always Rings Twice and Saul Bellow’s The Adventures of Augie March, A Farewell to Arms is a remarkable writing achievement in the form of not very good writing
16 people found this helpful
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Pianissimo
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Irritating style, and an over-rated author
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 24, 2018
This book is interesting as far as the story goes, but Hemingway''s style, or rather the lack of it, leaves a lot to be desired! It is very banal and unimaginative, and the deliberate absence of commas is irritating. Also, his characters are one-dimentional. Heaven knows why...See more
This book is interesting as far as the story goes, but Hemingway''s style, or rather the lack of it, leaves a lot to be desired! It is very banal and unimaginative, and the deliberate absence of commas is irritating. Also, his characters are one-dimentional. Heaven knows why he is rated so highly ... I don''t get it. Read Solzhenitsin if you want good literature.
7 people found this helpful
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Ivan's choice
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful hardcover and equally beautiful story
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 29, 2018
Many years ago, I put down the story after reading about 30 pages or so. But this time round, I force myself to read it again and what a pleasant chance of attitude towards it. What does war mean to a young man? To the protagonist Mr Henry, who serves as an ambulance driver...See more
Many years ago, I put down the story after reading about 30 pages or so. But this time round, I force myself to read it again and what a pleasant chance of attitude towards it. What does war mean to a young man? To the protagonist Mr Henry, who serves as an ambulance driver in the Italian territory. It is unsound and unreasonable. He first gets wounded in the knee, gets himself treated and risks his life by going back to the front. When the army is in retreat, he almost gets himself shoot by high-rank officers, who do not reason nor do they care how many soldiers they have to shoot to kill. Mr Henry decides to run away from such madness by jumping into a nearby stream and gets drifted away from the retreating army. With a floating log, he survives bad luck and comes back to visit his girl, Catherine. With the help of a barman, the young couple run away and seek refuge in Switzerland. The story concludes with the death of Catherine who dies of hemorrhage in hospital. The story is written in the first person, with a linear storyline. Unlike For Whom the Bell Tolls, this is not punctuated with artistic effect which calls attention to the text itself; rather it has a smoothness that appeals to readers both contemporary and nowadays. Though the delivery of my book is late for 5 works days, I am able to finish reading it in 2018, the 100th anniversary of the victorious ending of World War One, during which the fictionalized story took place and in which the author drew his experience. Deeply touching!
7 people found this helpful
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Felix the cat
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very strange
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 25, 2020
Reading this book was like watching a foreign film with subtitles. It read like a bad translation. The descriptions of war and places were both confusing and dull. The characters were bizarre . What was wrong with the cardboard cut out Catherine. It was all very very odd...See more
Reading this book was like watching a foreign film with subtitles. It read like a bad translation. The descriptions of war and places were both confusing and dull. The characters were bizarre . What was wrong with the cardboard cut out Catherine. It was all very very odd and not very entertaining.
2 people found this helpful
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Barry Dougall
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Flawed classic
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 11, 2021
I did appreciate the legendary Hemingway style: paired back, unsentimental, stark....and the scenes of an army in retreat were memorable as were the moving final passages. Using the first person narrative was sometimes jarring and the characters, particularly Nurse Barclay,...See more
I did appreciate the legendary Hemingway style: paired back, unsentimental, stark....and the scenes of an army in retreat were memorable as were the moving final passages. Using the first person narrative was sometimes jarring and the characters, particularly Nurse Barclay, I found were unsympathetic, even irritating. As a novel set in WW1 in my opinion, as has been commented eleswhere, it does not compare favourably with "All Quiet on the Western Front."
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