Adèle: wholesale A high quality Novel online

Adèle: wholesale A high quality Novel online

Adèle: wholesale A high quality Novel online

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"Fascinating . . . Adèle has glanced at the covenant of modern womanhood--the idea that you can have it all or should at least die trying--and detonated it." --The New York Times Book Review

"[A] fierce, uncanny thunderbolt of a book." --Entertainment Weekly

From the bestselling author of The Perfect Nanny--one of the 10 Best Books of the Year of The New York Times Book Review--as well as Sex and Lies and In the Country of Others, her prizewinning novel about a sex-addicted woman in Paris


She wants only one thing: to be wanted.

Adèle appears to have the perfect life: She is a successful journalist in Paris who lives in a beautiful apartment with her surgeon husband and their young son. But underneath the surface, she is bored--and consumed by an insatiable need for sex.

Driven less by pleasure than compulsion, Adèle organizes her day around her extramarital affairs, arriving late to work and lying to her husband about where she''s been, until she becomes ensnared in a trap of her own making. Suspenseful, erotic, and electrically charged, Adèle is a captivating exploration of addiction, sexuality, and one woman''s quest to feel alive.

Review

One of O, The Oprah Magazine’s 10 Titles to Pick Up Now
One of Time’s 11 New Books to Read This January
One of Entertainment Weekly’s 20 New Books to Read in January
One of amNewYork’s 8 New Novels to Read in 2019
One of The Million’s Most Anticipated of 2019
One of Nylon’s 50 Books Youll Want to Read in 2019


“Bold, stylish and deeply felt.” — The Wall Street Journal

“A slim, compelling read,  Adèle examines topics ranging from marriage and motherhood to adultery, but the overarching theme is the notion of freedom. . . . The plot of  Adèle recalls Kundera’s masterwork [ The Unbearable Lightness of Being].” — Vanity Fair

“The feverish spark of obsession licks at the corner of nearly every page.” — Entertainment Weekly

“Sultry, polarizing.” — New York, The Approval Matrix: Highbrow/Brilliant

“[A] short but weighty book about a self-destructive wife and mother caught in the throes of sex addiction.” — New York, “6 New Paperbacks You Should Read This January”

“Sensational . . . In her novels, home and hearth are a furnace, not a haven. Families are groups in which power struggles are conducted in close quarters, and with gloves off.” — Time

“A feminasty thriller.” — O, The Oprah Magazine

“Engrossing . . . Bracing . . . [A] frisson of tension propels  Adèle. . . . Shattering.” — San Francisco Chronicle

“Brave . . . A skillfully turned novel that gives us nothing we expect . . . Its clean, affectless prose may recall Camus. (A gifted stylist, Slimani can pack a sneaky wallop when she wants.) . . . Any Slimani novel is a major event.” — The Philadelphia Inquirer

“Bracingly erotic . . . Once again Slimani unveils a story which reads us and our moral reactions as we turn its pages.” — John Freeman, Lit Hub

“If Sally Rooney is her generation’s essential writer on sex, Slimani . . . is its most compelling writer on violence. Her prose is grotesque and vivid; indulging nothing that doesn’t need to be indulged.” — The New Statesman

“Bracing . . . Elegantly written . . . Provocatively enigmatic.” — The Guardian

“Thrilling . . . The tight pacing and spare style that had readers hooked to [ The Perfect Nanny] are still here. . . . Slimani is one of the few contemporary authors—along, perhaps, with Rachel Cusk and Deborah Levy—writing intelligently about motherhood today.” — The Sunday Times (U.K.)

“One of the most unusual books I’ve ever read. Get a copy if you can, and be prepared to be shaken and stirred by a feat of great writing on an intriguing subject.” — Lorraine Candy, The Sunday Times (U.K.)

“Unsparingly lucid . . . [Written] in taut, lithe prose . . . A tender and troubling novel.” — Financial Times

“A riveting and psychologically rich novel, its final pages particularly stirring . . . A story that will strike a chord with many women . . . Slimani is a fearless writer who pulls back the curtain to show what secretly thrills and terrifies women.” — Evening Standard

“Very racy . . . Intensely graphic . . . Set to cause shockwaves on a global scale.” — Daily Mail

“[Slimani] writes with a cool detachment and unflinching emotional honesty that takes your breath away. . . . [She is] as eloquent on aftermath and exile as the chase of the high.” — Vogue (U.K.)

“Haunted and compulsive . . . gripping.” — Words Without Borders
 
“Fascinating . . . A dizzying array of sex scenes . . . One can’t be prepared for  Adèle.” — The AV Club

“No man would have dared write what she did. It’s an extraordinary first novel.” — Alain Mabanckou, author of Black Moses and judge for the La Mamounia Prize

Adèle exposes the contradictory urges of modern womanhood: to want to control and lose control; to mother and destroy; to be adored by many but needed by no one; to be irreproachable in conduct but free to live as she desires. It is a timely, startling read that I dare you to put down.” — Courtney Maum, author of Touch

“Searing, incisive, fearless, and a damn fine read.” — Elisa Albert, author of After Birth and The Book of Dahlia

“What’s really compelling about the way Slimani writes Adèle is that she doesn’t try to psychologize her or really account for her motivations. . . . Slimani makes no apologies for her character. But neither are we meant to see her as some kind of unlikable anti-heroine. She’s just a woman with certain desires, full stop, and Slimani is more interested in exploring her reckoning with them than in justifying or explaining them.” — Lauren Elkin, author of Flaneuse

“[Slimani] is now the archetype of a certain international image of a female French author: talented, open-minded, and politically engaged.” — Vanity Fair (France), “The 50 Most Influential French People in the World”

“Exposes the dark desires of a seemingly normal woman . . . Adèle—and the reader—must come to terms with what it is we demand of women in modern times, and how those punishing requirements lead so many of us to crack and try and get autonomy through unorthodox means.” — Nylon, “50 Books You’ll Want to Read in 2019”

“Almost heart-wrenching . . . Slimani’s terse prose hurls toward its inevitable conclusion.” — amNewYork

“Cancel your plans, because you’ll finish this addictive novel in one weekend.” — Apartment Therapy

“Slimani’s fascinating follow-up to The Perfect Nanny . . . is a skillful character study. Slimani’s ending is the perfect conclusion to this memorable snapshot of sex addiction.” — Publishers Weekly

“Eminently relatable . . . Artful, edgy . . . An unflinching exploration of female self-sacrifice and the elusive nature of satisfaction.” — Kirkus Reviews

“[A] pacey page-turner . . . that keeps you guessing. . . . [Adèle is] a character that anyone who has ever felt a little unsatisfied with life should be able to relate to.” The Press Association

“Written in prose of elegant but never bloodless neutrality . . . [ Adèle] leads readers through the labyrinth of desire into an understanding of solitude, isolation and the search for authenticity as our common fate.”  The Independent  (London)

“An explosive portrait of the claustrophobia that can come with marriage and motherhood and the damaging consequences of stifling women’s sexuality.” Irish Mail on Sunday

“Shocking . . . A brave choice for the international panel of judges [of the La Mamounia Prize] . . . [It] somehow slipped passed Moroccan censors, but it''s a safe bet no Moroccan publisher would have dared print it.” — The Irish Times

“Displays an undeniable literary power.”  L’Express (France)

About the Author

Leila Slimani is the bestselling author of The Perfect Nanny, one of The New York Times Book Review''s 10 Best Books of the Year, for which she became the first Moroccan woman to win France''s most prestigious literary prize, the Goncourt . She won the La Mamounia Prize for  Adèle. A journalist and frequent commentator on women''s and human rights, she is French president Emmanuel Macron''s personal representative for the promotion of the French language and culture and was ranked #2 on Vanity Fair France''s annual list of The Fifty Most Influential French People in the World. Born in Rabat, Morocco, in 1981, she now lives in Paris with her French husband and their two young children.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Adèle has been good. She has held out for a week now. She hasn’t given in. She has run twenty miles in the past four days. From Pigalle to the Champs-Elysées, from the Musée d’Orsay to Bercy. In the mornings, she has gone running on the deserted banks of the Seine. At night, on the Boulevard Rochechouart and the Place de Clichy. She hasn’t touched a drop of alcohol and she has gone to bed early.
But tonight she dreamed about it and she couldn’t fall back asleep. A torrid dream that went on forever, that entered her like a breath of hot wind. Now Adèle can think of nothing else. She gets up and drinks a strong black coffee. The house is silent. In the kitchen she hops about restlessly. She smokes a cigarette. Standing in the shower, she wants to scratch herself, to rip her body in two. She bangs her forehead against the wall. She wants someone to grab her and smash her skull into the glass door. As soon as she shuts her eyes she hears the noises: sighs, screams, blows. A naked man panting, a woman coming. She wishes she were just an object in the midst of a horde. She wants to be devoured, sucked, swallowed whole. She wants fingers pinching her breasts, teeth digging into her belly. She wants to be a doll in an ogre’s garden.
She doesn’t wake anyone. She gets dressed in the dark and does not say goodbye. She is too nervous to smile or have a conversation. Adèle leaves the house and walks the empty streets. Head down and nauseous, she descends the stairs of the Jules-Joffrin metro station. On the platform a mouse runs across her boot and startles her. In the carriage, Adèle looks around. A man in a cheap suit is watching her. He has badly shined shoes with pointed tips. He’s ugly. He might do. So might that student with his arm around his girlfriend, kissing her neck. Or that middle-aged man standing by the window who reads his book and doesn’t even glance at her.
She picks up a day-old newspaper from the seat opposite. She turns the pages. The headlines blur, she can’t concentrate. Exasperated, she puts it down. She can’t stay here. Her heart is banging hard in her chest, she’s suffocating. She loosens her scarf, unwinds it from around her sweat-soaked neck and drops it in an empty seat. She stands up, unbuttons her coat. Holding onto the door handle, her legs shaken by tremors, she is ready to jump.
She’s forgotten her telephone. She sits down again and empties her handbag, A powder compact falls to the floor. She tugs at a bra strap entwined with earbuds. Seeing the bra, she tells herself she needs to be more careful. She can’t have forgotten her phone. If she has, she’ll have to go back to the house, come up with an excuse. But no, here it is. It was there all the time, she just didn’t see it. She tidies her handbag. She has the feeling that everyone is staring at her. That the whole carriage is sneering at her panic, her burning cheeks. She opens the little flip phone and laughs when she sees the first name.
Adam.
It’s no use anyway.
Wanting to is the same as giving in. The dam has been breached. What good would it do to hold back now? Life wouldn’t be any better. She’s thinking like a drug addict, like a gambler. She was so pleased with herself for not having yielded to temptation for a few days that she forgot about the danger. She gets to her feet, lifts the sticky latch, the door opens.
Madeleine station.
She pushes her way through the crowd that swells like a wave around the carriage and gushes inside. Adèle looks for the exit. Boulevard des Capucines. She starts to run. Let him be there, let him be there. Outside the storefront windows she hesitates. She could catch the Métro here: Line 9 would take her directly to the office, she’d be there in time for the editorial meeting. She paces around the Métro entrance, lights a cigarette. She presses her handbag to her body. Some Romanian women in headscarves have spotted her. They advance toward her, holding out their stupid petition. Adèle rushes off. She enters Rue Lafayette in a trance, gets lost and has to retrace her steps. Rue Bleue. She types in the code and goes inside, runs upstairs to the second floor and knocks on the heavy wooden door.
‘Adèle…’ Adam smiles. His eyes are puffy with sleep and he’s naked.
‘Don’t speak.’ Adèle takes off her coat and throws herself at him. ‘Please.’
‘You could call, you know… It’s not even eight yet…’
Adèle is already naked. She scratches his neck, pulls his hair. He doesn’t care. He’s hard. He shoves her violently, slaps her face. She grabs his dick and pushes it inside her. Up against the wall, she feels him enter and her anxieties dissolve. Her sensations return. Her soul is lighter, her head an empty space. She grips Adam’s arse and drives him into her angrily, ever faster. She is possessed, in a fever, desperately trying to reach another place. ‘Harder, harder,’ she screams.
She knows this body and that annoys her. It’s too simple, too mechanical. Her surprise arrival did not transform Adam. Their lovemaking is not obscene enough or tender enough. She puts Adam’s hands on her breasts, tries to forget that it’s him. She closes her eyes and imagines that he’s forcing her.
Already he is somewhere else. His jaw tenses. He turns her around. As always, he pushes Adèle’s head down toward the floor with his right hand and grabs her hip with his left. He thrusts hard, he groans, he comes.
Adam tends to get carried away.
Adèle gets dressed with her back to him. She’s embarrassed at him seeing her naked.
‘I’m late for work. I’ll call you.’
‘As you like,’ replies Adam.
He smokes a cigarette, leaning against the kitchen door. With one hand, he touches the condom hanging from the end of his penis. Adèle looks away.
‘I can’t find my scarf. Have you seen it? It’s grey cashmere. I’m really fond of it.’
‘I’ll look for it. I can give it to you next time.’

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3.8 out of 53.8 out of 5
323 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Daniel Stuelpnagel
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Dull And Depressing
Reviewed in the United States on January 31, 2019
A thin short book vaguely portraying a drab cynical view of the human condition through a married couple living a miserable empty life. About the best thing a reader could say is “hmm, well, I’m glad I’m not them.” Hardly enough arc or material to call a novel,... See more
A thin short book vaguely portraying a drab cynical view of the human condition through a married couple living a miserable empty life. About the best thing a reader could say is “hmm, well, I’m glad I’m not them.”

Hardly enough arc or material to call a novel, poignant and prurient perhaps, even pathetic, but ultimately not worth the time.
23 people found this helpful
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Sonpoppie
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A novel explores issues around sex and mother/wifehood
Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2019
Slimani’s novels Lullaby and Adèle explore topics we don’t normally talk about. Lust, sex addiction, female sexuality, and the ambivalence towards motherhood many women experience. She dissects modern motherhood through her stories. In her first novel, Lullaby, explored... See more
Slimani’s novels Lullaby and Adèle explore topics we don’t normally talk about. Lust, sex addiction, female sexuality, and the ambivalence towards motherhood many women experience. She dissects modern motherhood through her stories. In her first novel, Lullaby, explored infanticide and the tension between child-minders and their middle-class employers. A mother, ambivalent about motherhood, employs a nanny to care for her children. Relieved to escape the home, she projects her idea of the perfect mother onto the child-minder without properly checking references.
Adèle explores another subject that’s difficult, confronting and stigmatised — sex addiction in women especially in a wife and mother. This is most usually discussed through a male lens. A modern Madame Bovary Adèle seems to have everything — a doctor husband who loves her, a darling little son, a job as a journalist, a home — yet she has an itch, an unquenchable desire for rough, dominating sex and to have it often, and obsessively. The story explores the appetites, desires and urges for self-destruction, but without voyeurism, or moralising from the author. Slimani withholds judgement, prompts compassion, or at least comprehension, from her reader. You may not like what Adèle does but you have to have compassion for her.
Adèle’s sex addiction is a coping mechanism for someone who clearly has experienced a past trauma. Slimani hints at this without being explicit, rather the novel explores issues around sex and mother/wifehood, gender and race raising questions and discussion.
13 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An excellent description of a personality disorder
Reviewed in the United States on May 21, 2019
I downloaded this book, after I read an interview with the author on a local newspaper. I read it in less than 24 hours. The style is excellent, very detailed and describes the lines of thought of a person with a personality disorder zeroed on satisfying and occasionally... See more
I downloaded this book, after I read an interview with the author on a local newspaper. I read it in less than 24 hours. The style is excellent, very detailed and describes the lines of thought of a person with a personality disorder zeroed on satisfying and occasionally fighting against her addictionS. Yes, a CAPITAL ''S'': Adèle is addicted to alcohol (she''s described as ''drunk'' many times), drugs (marijuana and occasionally cocaine), plus sex. She complies with all the major criteria for an addictive disorder: time spent on satisfying one''s drive; distortion of one''s life priorities to do the same (marriage, motherhood, work) and occasional guilt and wish to carry on a ''normal'' life. I am a physician with 4 decades of primary care experience and the pattern of a personality and substance abuse disorder is excellently depicted in this novel. This is a clinical vignette; it is NOT a feminist manifesto. More so: it describes the suffering of any person of any gender, fighting the throes of addiction. Adèles plight is her own responsibility - and making: neither her parents nor her adolescent sexual experience are the root of her ''suffering''. Good food for thought for psychologists and psychotherapists.
10 people found this helpful
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roseystoney
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What''s the point???
Reviewed in the United States on January 17, 2020
As a fan of Slimani''s novel "The Good Nanny," I was eager to dip into "Adele." I should have curbed my enthusiasm and not set the bar so high since the disappointment was all the greater. This seems to me a pointless novel, no insightful takeaways or deeper understanding of... See more
As a fan of Slimani''s novel "The Good Nanny," I was eager to dip into "Adele." I should have curbed my enthusiasm and not set the bar so high since the disappointment was all the greater. This seems to me a pointless novel, no insightful takeaways or deeper understanding of the characters or the illuminating details that thrilled me in Slimani''s earlier novel. As in "The Perfect Nanny," Slimani''s prose is sparse, flat, cooly objective. While this airless style led to a heightened sense of drama, claustaphobia and tension in "The Perfect Nanny," the style here does not have the same effect. I plodded through this sad and senseless novel more out of duty than any interest in the plot or characters. You know the plot from the first sentence, "Adele has been good. She has held out for a week now." The sex-addicted protagonist will relapse by the second page (quicker than you might imagine since the opening paragraph begins in the middle of page one!) and not come to a good end, the countless men with whom she tries to satiate her desperate need are stock-characters -- you will not be able to recall any of them and neither can she -- and the naive, cuckholded husband will be enlightened and, because he is an MD in the business of saving lives, he will heroically try to save his wife too -- to no avail. Adele is a character who "wants to be devoured, sucked, swallowed whole . . . . She wants to be a doll in an ogre''s garden." In fact, she is an ogre in a doll''s garden. Her callous and all-consuming lust for pain and degradation overwhelms the simple men who feebly try to satiate her bestial greed. Adele is no modern day Emma Bovary, even though Adele''s husband entrenches them in a Bovaryesque Normandy house-w/-garden far from the temptations of Paris. Slimani''s Adele is more of an Adele H., although instead of being driven insane by the furies of unrequited love, this Adele is a one-dimensional character whose man-hopping is as erotically charged and psychologically riveting as a game of checkers.
4 people found this helpful
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Guerino Mazzola
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Precise vivisection of humanimsls
Reviewed in the United States on May 13, 2019
Slimani is a virtuosa of extremely precise observation of human animals. If you like this obsession, the style may satisfy you. However, in all her novels she focuses on negative characters, on subcutaneous psychopathologies of the so-called normals. It would be a... See more
Slimani is a virtuosa of extremely precise observation of human animals. If you like this obsession, the style may satisfy you.
However, in all her novels she focuses on negative characters, on subcutaneous psychopathologies of the so-called normals.
It would be a revelatory exercise to Slimani to write about a healthy, positive, vital force in humans. That would really be a counterpoint to the annoying cantus firmus of human despair.
Guerino Mazzola
2 people found this helpful
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K.W. Turner
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sex without Sexuality
Reviewed in the United States on March 30, 2019
This is a compelling read, and one of those stories of a life filled with desire in which the woman gets punished for her desires, but doesn''t quite repent. The ambiguities make the story interesting. The story dos the work, and the author is non-judgmental. I think it... See more
This is a compelling read, and one of those stories of a life filled with desire in which the woman gets punished for her desires, but doesn''t quite repent. The ambiguities make the story interesting. The story dos the work, and the author is non-judgmental. I think it captures a phenomenon that is much more common than women''s writing normally acknowledges. It is an anti-romance novel.
5 people found this helpful
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Gift Recipient
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not recommended
Reviewed in the United States on February 9, 2020
Ugh. Shouldn’t have finished it. But it was a quick read and i hate to stop in the middle. A painful story about a self destructive woman—I couldn’t understand or relate in any way to the protagonist. That''s just me. I bought it after reading a good review on the NPR... See more
Ugh. Shouldn’t have finished it. But it was a quick read and i hate to stop in the middle.
A painful story about a self destructive woman—I couldn’t understand or relate in any way to the protagonist. That''s just me. I bought it after reading a good review on the NPR booklist. So definitely disappointed.
2 stars because the writer was able to paint a vivid picture—wish i could have accessed the purpose of telling this story.
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Nadia Greenspan
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Translation is lacking
Reviewed in the United States on January 29, 2019
I am finding the translation much to be desired. Sam Taylor is a respected author and a translator, but this isn''t his best work. The book reads dry and sentences are directionless, with no body and shape. Just as the main heroine, who "does not like her job. She hates... See more
I am finding the translation much to be desired. Sam Taylor is a respected author and a translator, but this isn''t his best work. The book reads dry and sentences are directionless, with no body and shape. Just as the main heroine, who "does not like her job. She hates the idea that she must work for a living", I wonder if Mr. Taylor is burned out.
2 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Huckle
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unpleasant
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 8, 2019
The book is well written but I hated it, in fact I could not read anymore as I felt repulsed. This probably says a lot about the power of the writing. I felt the despair and the void within Adele but I just could not read any more. I pitied her, her husband and her child...See more
The book is well written but I hated it, in fact I could not read anymore as I felt repulsed. This probably says a lot about the power of the writing. I felt the despair and the void within Adele but I just could not read any more. I pitied her, her husband and her child and I just did not want to know how much more awful it could be.
19 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
god I hated this book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 8, 2019
i NEVER write reviews. but I hated this book so much I feel it needed saying.I read a lot, a wide variety and I rarely give up on a book. But this book offers nothing. there is no redeeming features, there''s no sympathetic characters, there''s no real explantion for her...See more
i NEVER write reviews. but I hated this book so much I feel it needed saying.I read a lot, a wide variety and I rarely give up on a book. But this book offers nothing. there is no redeeming features, there''s no sympathetic characters, there''s no real explantion for her behaviour and no resoution. The writing is brief, concise and matter of fact, which suits the story, but does not save it. It feels, in short, like gratuitous cruel writing for no legitimate reason. I can only recommend that you avoid this book and your life will be the better for it.
15 people found this helpful
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EZW
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Superb
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 15, 2019
Brilliant. Read this book in one go - okay it wasn’t very long - because it flowed so wonderfully. I would have loved it if there had been more, perhaps just a bit more insight into these intriguing lives.
7 people found this helpful
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Suzie Wong
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No plot, no story
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 13, 2019
Following Lullaby, which I loved , I had high hopes for this book. Some of it is fairly interesting, for example her blatent promiscuity; however other than that there is no real thread holding the story together. There is no plot, no insight into why she sleeps around and...See more
Following Lullaby, which I loved , I had high hopes for this book. Some of it is fairly interesting, for example her blatent promiscuity; however other than that there is no real thread holding the story together. There is no plot, no insight into why she sleeps around and no decent ending. It was a holiday read and very forgettable.
4 people found this helpful
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Brida
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"Her only ambition is to be wanted."
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 17, 2020
Female sexuality is an interesting beast; in literature and the arts, very often there will either be the femme fatale presented, or the girl-next-door. But, this is really doing a disservice to women. Female sexuality is much more complex and nuanced than that. Having just...See more
Female sexuality is an interesting beast; in literature and the arts, very often there will either be the femme fatale presented, or the girl-next-door. But, this is really doing a disservice to women. Female sexuality is much more complex and nuanced than that. Having just finished Adele, I am left wondering what Slimani is trying to say about it, and what she hoped to bring to the subject of female sexuality. "Adele" features a lead female protagonist, Adele, who is married to a successful man, with a young boy. Although from the outside it looks as though she would have everything that she wanted, she has an insatiable desire for sex. She thinks nothing of putting everything on the line in order to meet these needs. "Her only ambition is to be wanted." (p. 52) For her, being wanted means, often, cheap meetings in seedy hotels, just to get the thrill that she is seeking. Personally, this burning desire in Adele just didn''t really translate into a very relatable, or likeable character. And, other than you reading about the various different men that she has encounters with, nothing else really happens. I just don''t see how this novel has given anything really positive to the idea of female sexuality. Slimani paints Adele in such a bad light that there is hardly anything which redeems her. Even the way that she sees being a mother, as a constraint and an obstacle in what she would really like to be doing, just sets her apart from a lot of other women who would be mothers, but also sexual beings: "Lucien is a burden, a constraint that she struggles to get used to... Adele had a child for the same reason that she got married: to belong to the world and to protect herself from other people. As a wife and mother, she is haloed with a respectability that no one can take away from her. She has built herself a refuge for her nights of anguish and a comfortable retreat for her days of debauchery." (p. 26) There is nothing to aspire to here, nothing of female empowerment, as it is falling into the stereotype that a woman has to either be a good mother, or that she can be sexy, in control of her own fate, but she cannot be both. I think, for this reason, amongst others, I found this novel to be really quite depressing. Despite Adele seeming to believe that she is in control of her life, and her body, there are moments when she is portrayed as being a submissive/passive female, who is dependent on male appreciation in order to feel good about herself: "Men rescued her from her childhood. They dragged her from the mud of adolescence and she traded childish passivity for the lasciviousness of a geisha." (p. 122) No matter how Slimani tries to portray Adele, I do not see her as a woman who is enjoying, and in control of her sexuality. In fact, there are times when she seems to decline in mental health due to it. Her self-worth is tied up with how men respond to her, even if she doesn''t find them sexually attractive. Whilst it shouldn''t matter how many partners a woman has, I feel that Slimani has made Adele fall into a disagreeable category, by how she has created her character for this tale. As Adele herself observes, "The men are going to think that she''s up for it, easy, a slut. The women will treat her as a predator; the kinder ones might say that she''s emotionally fragile." (p. 19) I would have enjoyed this novel more if there had been more complexity and nuance to Adele''s character; something that draws her up from the levels of depravity that she describes to us.
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Adèle: A Novel




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Adèle: wholesale A high quality Novel online

Adèle: wholesale A high quality Novel online

Adèle: wholesale A high quality Novel online

Adèle: wholesale A high quality Novel online

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