Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale
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Product Description

On the morning of Eva McEwen''s birth, six magpies congregate in the apple tree outside the window--a bad omen, according to Scottish legend. That night, Eva''s mother dies, leaving her to be raised by her aunt and heartsick father in their small Scottish town. As a child, Eva is often visited by two companions--a woman and a girl--invisible to everyone else save her. As she grows, their intentions become increasingly unclear: Do they wish to protect or harm her? A magical novel about loneliness, love, and the profound connection between mother and daughter, Eva Moves the Furniture fuses the simplicity of a fairy tale with the complexity of adult passions.

From The New Yorker

What is extraordinary about this novel is the fretwork of feeling among its unorthodox cast of characters. Eva McEwen grows up engulfed by a vast and hopeful loneliness. She lives in a small Scottish town with her father and an overprotective aunt, her mother having died of the flu at her birth, in 1920. After Eva turns six, her solitary play is interrupted at unpredictable moments by a girl and a woman who, more than once, come to her aid. Only when she starts school does she realize that these two are invisible to everyone else—and, moreover, jealous of new acquaintances. At eighteen, Eva is desperate to escape the emotional tyrannies of her upbringing, but she eventually comes to feel the fullness of her love for both the real and the imaginary companions of her childhood. Livesey has written a ghost story, of sorts, minus the theremin music—like "Our Town," with its speakers from the grave—and, if it moves you, the end will send you back to the beginning again.
Copyright © 2005 The New Yorker

Review

“Margot Livesey is a writer at the pinnacle of her craft. Eva Moves the Furniture is such a complete, sturdy yet graceful novel that it is difficult for a critic to wedge herself in between the writer and the reader.” ―Los Angeles Times Book Review

“Livesey is a writer of tremendous grace and precision.... [Her] wonderful new novel will haunt you in a sweet way, and leave you with a spark of hope for us all.” ―Chicago Tribune

“What is extraordinary about this novel is the fretwork of feeling among its unorthodox cast of characters.... Livesey has written a ghost story, of sorts...and, if it moves you, the end will send you back to the beginning.” ―The New Yorker

“Stunning...She limns her tale with beautiful evocations of the loneliness of childhood, the shimmery quality of ghostly spirits and the fear and excitement of wartime.” ―San Francisco Chronicle Book Review

“In this fetching, ultimately moving novel, magic and danger are so inextricably bound that the palpable world seems slightly less trustworthy than the one you cannot see.” ―The Boston Globe

“Livesey writes with such restraint that the shock lies in events themselves, not her language. She uses metaphors beautiful in their precision....Simultaneously chilling and compassionate.” ―The Washington Post Book World

“This is a novel that enters the reader''s life in much the same way that the companions come to Eva. It looks harmless enough, like a child''s fantasy, inhabiting a fairy tale in which powerful, other-worldly forces are at work, but reader beware. If you give Eva McEwen just a little space in your own imagination, she will start moving the furniture.” ―The New York Times Book Review

“Perfectly structured...In prose direct and precise she limns Eva''s story with steady authority.” ―The Atlantic Monthly

About the Author

Margot Livesey is the award-winning author of a story collection, Learning by Heart, and of the novels Homework, Criminals, The Missing World, and Eva Moves the  Furniture, which was a New York Times Notable Book, an Atlantic Monthly Best Book of the Year, and a PEN/Winship finalist. Born in Scotland, she currently lives in the Boston area, where she is writer in residence at Emerson College.

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4.2 out of 54.2 out of 5
89 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Michelle Boytim
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mysterious being move the furniture and influence Eva''s life
Reviewed in the United States on February 28, 2013
Eva was born under the ominous omen of 6 magpies in a tree outside. When her mother dies right after childbirth, she is left to her father''s care until her aunt arrives, having given up her own dreams to help care for Eva. They are not the only ones to watch over her, as... See more
Eva was born under the ominous omen of 6 magpies in a tree outside. When her mother dies right after childbirth, she is left to her father''s care until her aunt arrives, having given up her own dreams to help care for Eva. They are not the only ones to watch over her, as she has two "imaginary friends": one a young girl, and the other is an older woman. It becomes clear that these are not ordinary childhood imaginings as she gets older, but she is unsure if they are guardian angels, ghost, or perhaps a more malevolent presences. We observe Eva as she grows up, seeing how these presences affect her life, sometimes positively, by getting her out of dangerous situations, and sometimes in negative or confusing ways as they encourage her to apply for a job, for her only to get fired shortly thereafter. Eva notes their presence either visually or by them moving objects, particularly furniture. As World War II approaches and passes, we see Eva as a nurse, moving on to a more adult life. We see her as she embraces love and faces heartbreak, partly stemming from her companions. She learns bit by bit about these two mysterious beings and eventually figures out who/what they are, and in her moment of greatest need passes along an important gift. This was a short, but touching story that was a primarily a coming of age tale with just a touch of the supernatural.
2 people found this helpful
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frumiousb
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
My life in the book of ghosts-- Affecting and beautifully written.
Reviewed in the United States on May 21, 2006
Eva Moves the Furniture is a strange little book. It is worth respecting as much for what it does not do as for what it does. In a story like this one it would be tempting to write it very large. It would also be tempting to wrap all the loose ends up neatly. Livesey takes... See more
Eva Moves the Furniture is a strange little book. It is worth respecting as much for what it does not do as for what it does. In a story like this one it would be tempting to write it very large. It would also be tempting to wrap all the loose ends up neatly. Livesey takes neither route, and the book is both stronger and richer for the choice.

Eva Moves the Furniture is a kind of ghost story. It is also a kind of love story. In both ways, the book is less about the relationship between individuals than it is about the relationship between people and the world. Even people with unassuming lives have love. We presume that they also all have ghosts-- even if less obvious ones than Eva has.

One of the most interesting things about this book is its ambivalence. The Companions seem kind, but also dangerous. We are happy for Eva with what she eventually finds, but we also regret the love that she loses. It isn''t clear what everything means, and one of the lessons is that things sometimes end without having meaning assigned to their passing. The novel felt a lot like life in that sense, and I found it quite brave of the author to resist the more obvious symbols and conclusions.

Livesey is a writer of exceptional quality. The prose is very fine.

If you are looking for a story about a big life, this is probably not the book for you. Although historical fiction, it is not a book about nations or kings. Eva is a normal person, who has something extraordinary to watch over her. It can also be a very sad book, despite being quite joyful in places.

I would recommend this book to most people. If you are a fan of writers like Barbara Pym then you will probably particularly enjoy it. I will definitely be reading more works by Livesey, as they are available.
4 people found this helpful
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jane veecee
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
British life with a whiff of the supernatural
Reviewed in the United States on September 26, 2020
As a huge Margot Livesey fan, with an interest in the World War II generation, I enjoyed this book very much.. and the supernatural element is something Livesey’s mother did experience. BUT I urge readers to get the newest novel: “The Boy in the Field” it’s wonderful
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Mary, Reviewer's Diary
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Riveting -- a definite keeper! Excellent
Reviewed in the United States on August 15, 2004
This story will break your heart. It is so perfectly beautiful that writing this review is an amazing challenge. The story is told in first person narrative by Eva McEwen a lonely girl whose mother died in childbirth. She is adored by her widower... See more
This story will break your heart.

It is so perfectly beautiful that writing this review is an amazing challenge.

The story is told in first person narrative by Eva McEwen a lonely girl whose mother died in childbirth. She is adored by her widower father and her aunt, who has come to help raise her. Though beloved by her family, she is lonely, friendless, and very isolated. When she is six years old the "companions" visit her for the first time.

From her childhood through her adult life we watch Eva mature and grow into a woman, eventually becoming a nurse during WWII in Scotland. The companions are with her from start to finish.

Are they good or are they evil? You''ll have to read the book to find out.

This gut-wrenching story is one you won''t be able to put down until the last page. I sat silently for several minutes after the last line of the book - it had such a great impact. This book is a keeper.
12 people found this helpful
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Mandy
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Okay story, underdeveloped characters
Reviewed in the United States on July 18, 2012
As someone else stated in their review, this book feels more like a short story. I enjoyed the writing, although I didn''t understand some of her references a few times- maybe they are regional? I would have liked the book more if the characters were fleshed out better. It... See more
As someone else stated in their review, this book feels more like a short story. I enjoyed the writing, although I didn''t understand some of her references a few times- maybe they are regional? I would have liked the book more if the characters were fleshed out better. It felt like a rush to the end, and then I couldn''t really understand why I was crying, when I barely understood the characters. The plot and characters just felt underdeveloped to me. I appreciated the time of the book spent describing her relationship with her daughter, but it was much too short. Maybe that was purposeful though.
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Dodd-o
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Silly
Reviewed in the United States on September 19, 2021
Couldn’t get into it
Donated it
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syb123
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A tough read if you''re a parent
Reviewed in the United States on January 9, 2006
This book is beautifully written, with characters that are really alive (even the dead ones) and a compelling story. So why only three stars? I loved it right up to about the last ten pages. I won''t spoil the ending, but will only say that the book''s final images are... See more
This book is beautifully written, with characters that are really alive (even the dead ones) and a compelling story. So why only three stars? I loved it right up to about the last ten pages. I won''t spoil the ending, but will only say that the book''s final images are still in my nightmares. The book is beautiful and well crafted, but for many people, some books (Sophie''s Choice, The Child in Time, etc) go on the embargo list during the early parenthood years. If you''re one of those people, this book may not be for you.
8 people found this helpful
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judy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The characters are so real and warm. Eva becomes a close and kind friend. Loved this book from beginning to end.
Reviewed in the United States on October 13, 2016
The characters are kind and warm. Eva becomes your best friend. Her trails are your trails. Loved this book from beginning to end.
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Top reviews from other countries

Eileen Shaw
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"Seemingly random incidents of my life were in fact organised according to some hidden pattern."
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 3, 2010
It is Margot Livesey''s contention in this book that some people find themselves with companions that are not of this world, in fact, dead people who are there to guide them down a path that is `right'' for them. As a child, Eva often sees her companions, talks to them and...See more
It is Margot Livesey''s contention in this book that some people find themselves with companions that are not of this world, in fact, dead people who are there to guide them down a path that is `right'' for them. As a child, Eva often sees her companions, talks to them and allows them to influence her, and in later life even to the point where they guide her into a marriage, help her escape from a couple of threatening men, and even help her lift her sick father out of a river where he''s been taken ill while fishing. They nudge her into jobs, then out of one into another. It turns out that they are people who have died before she was even born, but they are all her family members. Eva is guided out of one relationship with a man, and into another, though she has doubts about whether she really wants to forget the first man, a famous surgeon who is working with men who have been shot down and mutilated in battle. She is nudged towards a love affair with a young teacher instead, and marries him, mainly it appears because she wants a child. I found this whole premise feeble and almost simple-minded. Many children have imaginary friends but they grow out of them; Eva seems not to want to and in the end it''s hard not to see her as a perpetual child, her life managed for her to the point where she cannot take decisions or make choices on her own about any of the major developments of her life. Do people really enjoy being treated as if their own will must be bent away from any danger, excitement or real-life decisions? Livesey disappointed me in this book. She needs to return to the form of her wonderful book Banishing Verona and write about the real world again. I love her books as a rule, but this one is definitely not for me.
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Friederike
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is something special
Reviewed in Germany on July 26, 2013
It tells the story of a woman who has lived her whole life seeing people nobody else can see. Yet, it is in no way an unbelievable work of fiction and fairytales, but a book with a very moving storyline that keeps you reading until you have finished it all at once because...See more
It tells the story of a woman who has lived her whole life seeing people nobody else can see. Yet, it is in no way an unbelievable work of fiction and fairytales, but a book with a very moving storyline that keeps you reading until you have finished it all at once because you just need to know about Eva''s faith before laying it down again.
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Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale

Eva lowest Moves the Furniture: lowest A Novel sale