Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

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Product Description

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A complete meat and brisket-cooking education from the country''s most celebrated pitmaster and owner of the wildly popular Austin restaurant Franklin Barbecue.

When Aaron Franklin and his wife, Stacy, opened up a small barbecue trailer on the side of an Austin, Texas, interstate in 2009, they had no idea what they’d gotten themselves into. Today, Franklin Barbecue has grown into the most popular, critically lauded, and obsessed-over barbecue joint in the country (if not the world)—and Franklin is the winner of every major barbecue award there is.
 
In this much-anticipated debut, Franklin and coauthor Jordan Mackay unlock the secrets behind truly great barbecue, and share years’ worth of hard-won knowledge. Franklin Barbecue is a definitive resource for the backyard pitmaster, with chapters dedicated to building or customizing your own smoker; finding and curing the right wood; creating and tending perfect fires; sourcing top-quality meat; and of course, cooking mind-blowing, ridiculously delicious barbecue, better than you ever thought possible.

Review

“Aaron Franklin makes the finest barbecue I’ve ever had, barbecue worth waiting for. His work and his words express a truly rare level of commitment and expertise. With Franklin Barbecue, he shares it all—in a book that, fortunately, you don’t have to wait for.”
—Anthony Bourdain 

“I used to think Aaron Franklin was a genius: There was his rise from backyard dabbler to king of Texas pitmasters; his mind-altering brisket that made normally rational people (myself included) wait hours for the chance to eat it; and his insistence that game-changing barbecue doesn’t come from miracles but rather elbow grease. Then he wrote this book and gave all his secrets away. Now everyone—from me to you to your neighbor who can’t grill a chicken breast—will be able to make award-winning barbecue. He’s not a genius anymore; he’s a god.” 
—Andrew Knowlton, restaurant and drinks editor, Bon Appétit

“The most refreshing barbecue book to come along yet. Rather than preaching about ‘one true way,’ Aaron Franklin guides you through all the wood and smoke so that you can find your own style. And instead of just listing ingredients and rattling off generic recipes, these pages tell the story of a place and a barbecue tradition steeped in history. This isn’t just a book about barbecue;
this book is Central Texas barbecue.” 
—Daniel Vaughn, barbecue editor, Texas Monthly, and author of The Prophets of Smoked Meat

 “Pure genius! Aaron Franklin has distilled years’ worth of barbecue knowledge into this book. In it, he exposes the sacred insights of a top pitmaster—information that can otherwise only be learned from long nights spent staring at a fire, shovel in hand, constantly prodding and pinching your meat to figure out that ‘just perfect’ point of doneness. This book is a game changer: read it, and your barbecue will improve overnight!”
—Adam Perry Lang, chef, restaurateur, and author of Serious Barbecue

“A complete meat-and brisket-cooking education from the country’s most celebrated pitmaster. More than just a recipe book, this is a master course in the fine art of meat smoking, Texas-style.”
—Library Journal

About the Author

AARON FRANKLIN is a native of Bryan, Texas, and the co-owner and co-founder (along with his wife, Stacy) of Franklin Barbecue. Franklin Barbecue opened its doors in 2009, and has since gone on to win many awards, including "Best Barbecue in Texas" from Texas Monthly and "Best Barbecue in America" from Bon Appétit. Franklin is also the host of the PBS series BBQ with Franklin. He and his wife live in Austin with their daughter.

JORDAN MACKAY is the wine and spirits critic for San Francisco magazine, and the coauthor of the James Beard Award-winning Secrets of the Sommeliers. He lives in San Francisco.


Photography by Wyatt McSpadden.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The notion of putting everything I know about barbecue into a book is a daunting one. Not because I know so much—I’m still learning—but because of the nature of barbecue itself. It’s because the printed word—definitive, exacting, permanent—is in many ways antithetical to the process of cooking barbecue, which is, for lack of a better word, loosey-goosey.

So many people want to have a recipe, but with all of the variables in barbecue—wood, quality of fire, meat selection, type of cooker, weather, and so on—there is no “magic” recipe. It just doesn’t operate with absolutes of temperature, time, and measurement. In fact, there are no rights or wrongs in barbecue (well, that may be a stretch), no “just one way,” and certainly no simple “black and white.” You’re much better off with general knowledge of what you want and an arsenal of tricks to have up your sleeve.

So unlike most books that you may flip through a few times and then place on the shelf to display with the others, I hope this one will live a good portion of its life out in the field, be it in the kitchen or out by the smoker. These recipes aren’t really recipes but more of an idea of how I go about cooking barbecue and some guidelines.

Now, this book is not a survey of barbecue traditions across the country. While I’ve been all over the United States and have eaten lots of great barbecue, there’s really only one tradition that I know intimately: my own. My style is steeped in the tradition of Central Texas, but it’s also got some wrinkles that I discovered along the way.

So, with the greatest respect to all of the other styles around the country, in this book, all I discuss is what we do. Yes, I am wedded to the tradition of great Central Texas barbecue and the principles it holds—brisket, oak, open flame—but I’m also always willing to try something new or look into new designs that might make things cook faster and better. And my hope is that by being hyperdetailed and specific about my techniques, I will help you in your cooking and in your ability to develop your own style too. At Franklin Barbecue, the only thing we’ve got is the dedication to make the best food we can and to keep it consistently the same every day (which itself is the biggest challenge). It’s that dedication that keeps us evolving as cooks and constantly thinking about new ways to do old things.

You’ll notice that there’s a serious thread of do-it-yourself running through this book. That’s because one of the words with which I’ve been known to describe myself is cheap. For large stretches of my life, I didn’t have the cash to buy things I wanted, so I often just figured out how to make them myself. In the process, I sometimes discovered how to make them better or at least how to tailor them to my own needs. However, while I participate in DIY culture and continue to build stuff all of the time, it’s by no means necessary to take this approach in order to benefit from this book. I say, use whatever equipment you’ve got on hand; ideally, the information I present here will help you make the best of it.

Most barbecue books I’ve looked at are organized around the major food groups: beef, pork, poultry, and so on. (At least, those are my food groups.) In this book, which isn’t heavily focused on recipes, I’ve taken a different approach. It’s a more elemental and theoretical breakdown of the barbecue process. In each chapter, I drill down into some fairly technical information with regard to how the process of barbecue works. It can get a little geeky, but I hope that in a way the geekiness keeps you engaged. I include this information because I myself love the technical details. Understanding how something works is the first step toward successfully replicating and improving it.

The first chapter is an extended telling of my own story. I include it at this length not for the purpose of vanity, but the opposite—so that everyone can see how you don’t have to have much money, history, training, or even time to become proficient at barbecue. I really just want to show how a love for barbecue coupled with enthusiasm can equal really good-tasting smoked meat. If I can do this, you can too.

The second chapter is all about the smoker. In Texas, this piece of equipment might be called a smoker, cooker, and pit all in the same sentence, but whatever you call it, barbecue practitioners have no end of fascination with these clunky steel constructions. Everyone who designs and builds his or her own smoker does something a little bit different, always looking for that tweak that will improve its performance. In this chapter, I talk about various kinds of smokers and various modifications you can make to improve the performance of an inexpensive off-the-rack smoker you might buy at an outdoors store. I also give a very basic template for how to build your own smoker from scratch. It’s by no means a blueprint but rather intended to give you an idea of what to think about if you undertake such a project. While smoker construction sounds—and is—fairly ambitious, I can tell you that I’ve built very heavy smokers in my backyard with a cheap welder, rope, and a tree branch to hoist pieces up.

Chapter three is about wood. Wood is our sole fuel, but it’s also arguably the most important seasoning in the food. Without wood, barbecue wouldn’t be barbecue, so we have to take the wood we use as seriously as we would any ingredient in any dish. Just as you wouldn’t sauté meats and vegetables in rancid butter, you want to use good-quality firewood in pristine condition whenever possible. In this chapter, you’ll learn all about seasoning, splitting, buying, and judging wood for barbecue. After reading it, you’ll definitely be wanting your own little woodpile in the backyard. Just keep it dry.

It’s no big leap from wood to fire and smoke, the subjects of chapter four. Most people don’t realize there are gradations of smoke and fire. But a good fire and the fine smoke it produces are two of the most fundamental elements to producing superior Central Texas barbecue. In this chapter, I get into the nitty-gritty of what good smoke and fire mean and how to produce them in various conditions. It’s a bit sciencey, but it also tends to be pretty interesting, so hopefully you’ll get a lot out of it.

Chapter five is about meat. One of things I do differently from most other barbecue joints is use a higher grade of meat. It makes things more expensive for everyone (including me), but I think it’s worth it not only for the quality of the end product but also for the quality of life of the humans eating it and of the noble animals that were sacrificed to bring us this food. You’ll learn here what certain grades of meat mean, where they come from on the animal, and how to go about selecting the best meat for your cooking.

Chapter six is a doozy. It’s the one where I finally get into the actual cooking of the meat. If you buy this book and just want to dive right in, you could start here, though I recommend going back at some time to read all of the other stuff. This is the chapter where I do things like suggest temperatures and times for your cook, even though ultimately you have to figure out the fine details of these things for your own kind of cooker, your own conditions, and ultimately your own taste. But I do talk about other important stuff like trimming meats, rubbing, and wrapping—all the techniques that will help your meat turn out great. The bulk of this chapter is devoted to brisket and ribs, which are the two most popular meats, and cooked using the two basic methods of cooking we do. All of our other fare basically follows these methods, so to learn how to cook brisket and ribs in a smoker is to learn how to cook just about anything.

Lastly, we talk a little bit about sides, sauces, serving, drinking, and all of the stuff that goes hand in hand with enjoying the fruits of your labor. In Central Texas, sides and sauces are always considered secondary to the meat, if indeed necessary at all. So I don’t place a huge emphasis on them, even though I will admit that our beans are really good. More important is brisket slicing technique, which is something I go into detail about here. It’s hard to train people to cut brisket really well, but once you practice and repeat it, you’ll be glad to have good skill in this area, since there’s nothing worse than hacking up something you just spent a day coddling. And at last, beer, like day and night, is a fact of life for the pitmaster, and it’s something I think about a lot! So I talk a little about what I like and what I think works best with barbecue, though beer in general gets a big fat Yes.

Hopefully, while you read this book, you’ll find yourself chomping at the bit to get out there and throw a few racks of ribs or a big, honking brisket onto your smoker. And all I can say is, Go for it! The key to my own development—and it will be to yours—is repetition. Just as with anything, the more you do it, the better you’ll get. In barbecue that’s especially true, particularly if you pay close attention along the way to what you did during the cooking process and when you did it, and then you note the final results and think about how to make the next cook better. That’s what I did, and my barbecue improved steadily along the way. And I didn’t even have a resource like this book.

Ultimately, that’s the best advice I can give. Do, and do some more. Drink beer, but not so much that you lose track of what you’re doing. And pay attention. Sweat the details and you’ll end up producing barbecue that would make the most seasoned of pitmasters proud.

-----------------------------------

Fig Ancho Beer Barbecue sauce
I don’t serve this at the restaurant, but I do make fun sauces for some events—and this sauce combines a few of my favorite things.
Makes about 6 cups

4 ancho chiles, rehydrated in 4 1/2 cups hot water and the water reserved
12 figs, grilled, stemmed, and quartered
1/2 yellow onion, sliced
4 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
1 (12-ounce) bottle (1 1/2 cups) stout or porter beer (I prefer Left Hand Brewing’s milk stout)
1 cup ketchup
1/2 cup white vinegar
1/2 cup cider vinegar
6 tablespoons fig preserves
1 tablespoon honey
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon coarse black pepper

In a skillet over medium heat, sauté the chiles, figs, and onion in the butter for about 10 minutes, until the figs and chiles are tender and the onion is translucent. Transfer to a blender and add the sugar, stout, ketchup, both vinegars, the preserves, honey, salt, and pepper. Puree until smooth, adding as much of the reserved chile soaking liquid as needed to reach the desired texture. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

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Customer reviews

4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
8,982 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

M. Groesch
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Absolutely fantastic book. I bought 1 for myself
Reviewed in the United States on June 24, 2016
Absolutely fantastic book. I bought 1 for myself...and then bought 1 for my Dad and one for my Father in Law...Probably get one for my Stepdad Soon as well. I laughed when I read the 1 star reviews. This is NOT a cookbook. This book is about how Aaron Franklin ascended... See more
Absolutely fantastic book. I bought 1 for myself...and then bought 1 for my Dad and one for my Father in Law...Probably get one for my Stepdad Soon as well. I laughed when I read the 1 star reviews. This is NOT a cookbook. This book is about how Aaron Franklin ascended to his position as being one of the best BBQ Cooks in the Nation. He talks about what he did, why he did it, and what he learned along the way. He talks about his victories and defeats and how he gained just a little bit of knowledge during each cook. What he could use he kept, what didn''t work, he noted it, and tossed it aside. This is a great book on the science and theory of what is actually happening when you smoke something. The different kinds of wood that is used, the kind of smoker he likes, what temperature he prefers (275''), what he spritz''s his meats with while they cook, when to pull the meat off, when to wrap it, what to wrap it with, how and why to rest it..etc. etc...I have been grilling for 20+ years, and been smoking meat for about 10, and this book really really taught me a lot of things, and cleared up some things that I have noticed, but hadn''t really figured it out. He explains how to smoke meat in very simple terms. It IS simple to smoke meat...but you can totally screw it up if you don''t do it right. A perfect example that he talks about, and I did this when I first started, but luckily figured it out years ago is the fact that rookies see that Beef is done at 160-165 degrees and they think, welp, its done, might as well pull it off. They pull it off and let it sit, and when they slice into it, its tough or if its pork, it doesn''t pull or shred at all, and none of the fat has rendered and they think "What happened?? Well what happened is that yes, the meat reached a safe temp to eat, but not the OPTIMAL temp for BBQ. You want the internal temp at 203 degrees instead so the fat can liquefy and give the meat its juiciness and tenderness.
That is just one example. He lays it all out there for you, and doesn''t hold anything back. This is a simple process, but the devil is in those details, and he is adamant about them. There are a few recipes in the book, but this isn''t a cook book per se. I did like the recipes on the BBQ sauces though and Ive made them all. Aaron keeps it straightforward and simple. If you don''t learn anything from this book then you aren''t paying attention. I read a 1 star review and the guy goes, "Yeah, I learned to use salt and pepper and post oak....lame"
If you have that sort of mentality, then this book is definitely not for you, but if you want to reach in to what BBQ is, and how it is done right, and then you actually DO what he talks about, you will never screw up a piece of meat again.
335 people found this helpful
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Fire Stoker Joe
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Partially helpful for small backyard BBQ
Reviewed in the United States on March 20, 2019
I felt the smoking techniques and equipment portions is mostly for mobile caterers, the roadside BBQ truck guy or restaurant type production. The authors focus is obviously being very excited about his aspiration and success to high volume production of very fine BBQ for... See more
I felt the smoking techniques and equipment portions is mostly for mobile caterers, the roadside BBQ truck guy or restaurant type production. The authors focus is obviously being very excited about his aspiration and success to high volume production of very fine BBQ for consumer sales, not the typical backyard scenario. In speaking about smoker selection the focus is toward accommodating multiple full size briskets at a time, using 300 -1,000 gallon propane cylinders converted to be smokers, requiring cords of firewood and full size shovels as a primary tool, not tongs and small pokers. He doesn’t mention water smokers at all which are very established in this American culture of backyard BBQ and known to be winning in competition against the large offset smokers he is focusing on. The Weber “kettle grill” is mentioned very briefly, but in unfair comparison during smoker selection. The Weber kettle isn’t a smoker, it is an awesome grill. The Weber WSM is for backyard smoker enthusiasts and is a better choice of retail smoker than most of the offset smokers he evaluates and cautions the reader about purchasing, and then advises will need to be modified to render as acceptable. The author is very knowledgeable about large volume meat smoking for profit or someone who does BBQ for large groups of people on a consistent basis, that is his passion and focus. Some principles of smoking meat apply across the board, but the dynamics change considerably with large volume meat production vs typical small backyard operations. There is good info on meat selection and an excellent section on cutting brisket. If the book’s title or description would have indicated as being oriented toward the restaurant owner and volume production, then I feel it would deserve 5 stars from me.
131 people found this helpful
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Curtis Hart
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not a recipe book! Not a ‘how to’ book!
Reviewed in the United States on October 17, 2018
I’ve seen a lot of 1 star reviews for this book, complaining there’s not enough recipes or it doesn’t show how to use an electric smoker, etc, etc. This is not about that. What it IS about, is what Aaron Franklin has learned over the years as a pit... See more
I’ve seen a lot of 1 star reviews for this book, complaining there’s not enough recipes or it doesn’t show how to use an electric smoker, etc, etc.

This is not about that.

What it IS about, is what Aaron Franklin has learned over the years as a pit master and has passed along his knowledge to you.

That means a wood only smoker. Simple salt & pepper rubs. Basic cuts of meats (brisket, ribs, turkey and sausage) and the stories behind it.

That’s it. Now, you CAN get some really good insight on how to smoke meats and get a good foundation, based on what he does. But he doesn’t veer off what to do with different woods, recipes or techniques he doesn’t use.

So, if you want a book that helps you specifically with your Big Green Egg or pellet/electric smoker, this isn’t your book to get.

But...if you want a book with good stories. A good foundation of the science behind smoking meats. A few recipes. And what he does now and how he came to that way of doing things, then this is the book for you. It’s good, entertaining and chock full-o-wisdom and experience a pit master would usually not reveal to the average backyard smoker.
102 people found this helpful
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Earl D Walker
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Entertaining Read and great Biography but not a how-to book.
Reviewed in the United States on July 2, 2019
I found the book very entertaining to read, but very much limited in the "how-to" department. The background on Mr. Franklin was really the entertaining part and it in many ways explained how and why he chooses to BBQ the way he does. It is quite apparent that he is an... See more
I found the book very entertaining to read, but very much limited in the "how-to" department. The background on Mr. Franklin was really the entertaining part and it in many ways explained how and why he chooses to BBQ the way he does. It is quite apparent that he is an artist and has established brisket as his palette, a stick-burner as his brush, and post oak as his paint. And like many great masters, his choices reflect his passion for his art. But like many artists, their choices leave us more pragmatic kind of guys stymied.
As far teaching how to make great BBQ, his method, while undoubtedly resulting in great food, is probably far too difficult and expensive for the average backyard BBQ. For instance, he only speaks about stick-burners and goes to great lengths to say how difficult it is to make great BBQ on a cheap offset smoker; you know, the one that most people are gonna have. I roger that a 5000#, duel axle offset with a firebox bigger than my first house can certainly provide better heat stability than my 20 year old Brinkman, but regular Joes like myself will never own such a rig. He then spends a lot of time describing how much better UDSA Prime brisket is than the stuff you can find in a store. Again, most of us do not have the resources to purchase a $130 piece of brisket. Makes me wonder what a smoked beef tenderloin from Sam''s or Costco would taste like since it is cheaper than one of those briskets. There seemed to be some inconsistencies in when to wrap a brisket. In one section it says don''t pull off the brisket to wrap during the stall and that allowing it to continue to cook through the stall will result in dry meat, yet in another I got the distinct impression he wraps at the end of the stall? I would also have to guess he has made a conscience decision not to use any other form of smoker from the old R2D2, to pellet grill, to vertical, etc. so there will be no information in the book about that. On the other hand, I certainly agree with his assessment of wood choices (I''m an old West-Texas kind of guy, so absolutely love the biting taste of mesquite but find my neighbors differing in their opinion) and he spend enough time on this to really understand what standard of smoke he is looking for.
So to sum this up, the book is a good biography about a successful BBQ artist who has done very well in life through an intense work ethic, laser-focused attention to his craft and the most understanding wife I have ever heard of. I bet he would be a lot of fun to hang out with, eating good chow and alternating shots of hot espresso and cold beer. If you are purchasing the book to learn more about making great BBQ on your new Pellet/Propane/Electric/Kettle/Egg smoker for typical backyard affairs, you will likely be disappointed.
As FYI, I grew up on BBQ from around Lubbock Texas, spent 20 years in the Navy and live in North Florida now. My taste in BBQ is anchored to my childhood where the wood was mesquite, the smoke flavor was prolific and the meat was raised at home. Since your background is different, opinions will vary :)
21 people found this helpful
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9Weber
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not a cookbook - and that''s the whole point!
Reviewed in the United States on November 21, 2018
A few of the lower-rated reviews noted that this is not a cookbook. They''re right! If you came here (or anywhere, really) looking for a recipe for Texas slow-smoked brisket, you might have missed the point. Sadly, "simple" brisket recipes tend to lead people astray. The... See more
A few of the lower-rated reviews noted that this is not a cookbook. They''re right! If you came here (or anywhere, really) looking for a recipe for Texas slow-smoked brisket, you might have missed the point. Sadly, "simple" brisket recipes tend to lead people astray. The fact is that brisket is a troublesome beast with finicky characteristics that make it really challenging to produce consistently good results.

If you spend time with the best competition BBQ cooks, they can give you simple, repeatable steps that will result in a decent piece of meat, but the ingredient that''s impossible to share is experience. Aaron Franklin and the other folks who cook a consistently delicious brisket understand that there are no shortcuts. After you''ve cooked a few dozen briskets, you''ll start to get a feel for the little things that can have a big impact on your cook; your fire, wood choice, airflow, moisture, temperature consistency, etc.

In this book, you get a lot more than just recipes. Aaron walks you through the learning process. If you''re really serious about cooking a great brisket (or any smoked meat, for that matter), this book will give you insight into the process and the variables you should watch out for. So, while it''s true that this is not a traditional "cookbook," it is a wonderful guide to how to up your barbecue game.
19 people found this helpful
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Rick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
... smoke meat a lot for years and always was pleased with the outcome along with everyone else great comments ...
Reviewed in the United States on August 21, 2017
I smoke meat a lot for years and always was pleased with the outcome along with everyone else great comments always on my brisket. and this book has taught me that I have been doing it wrong for a long time. Now I followed it as close as I could he does not tell you exactly... See more
I smoke meat a lot for years and always was pleased with the outcome along with everyone else great comments always on my brisket. and this book has taught me that I have been doing it wrong for a long time. Now I followed it as close as I could he does not tell you exactly what he uses but he sure points you in the right direction. I smoked a brisket last weekend and it might not be his recipe or even come close to his recipe I tried my best. But one thing for sure it is the best damn brisket I ever put in my mouth, tender, full of flavor and I ate the whole thing over the rest of the weekend. This "Manifesto" IS well worth the price. I have watched this man on you tube everything they have to offer what a great individual. Quirky personality I think funny as hell my kind of people ...
68 people found this helpful
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MJ
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An inspirational book not a cook book
Reviewed in the United States on December 16, 2019
Sorry Aaron, I wish it was two different categories for giving stars. As a cook book I will give it one star, but as an inspirational book for some one who wants to start a BBQ restaurant , I will give it Five stars. This book is more about a success story of a person with... See more
Sorry Aaron, I wish it was two different categories for giving stars. As a cook book I will give it one star, but as an inspirational book for some one who wants to start a BBQ restaurant , I will give it Five stars. This book is more about a success story of a person with good intentions trying to tell his business success story but for an average guy like me who likes to learn how to smoke using a back yard smoker, there is no solid recipe to follow. not everybody has a 1000 gallon smoker that he or she needs a shovel to mange the fire, not everybody has a shop to modify and fix the manufacturing''s short comes. not everybody has access to the prime meat that almost impossible to find, not to many people are interested in vague chemical reaction between the fat and the smoke and the seasoning or scientific reason for the stall, we just want to cook in the back yard with a step by step recipe like the book Slow Fire that breaks down the recipe down to 1/4 teaspoon measurements that every time the end results are the same.
All and all, I congratulate Aaron for his success and this is not a criticizing review rather giving him an idea by changing the book''s little and with a little bit of modification in the book, this could be a number one selling book for inspirational purpose.
15 people found this helpful
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PugLover
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I bought just for his secrets
Reviewed in the United States on December 5, 2018
All i wanted to know was how to make award winning brisket and as soon as it arrived I just planned on flipping to the recipe pages, reading them then reselling it. But instead I started at the cover page and I was hooked. Learning about Aaron''s humble beginnings and all... See more
All i wanted to know was how to make award winning brisket and as soon as it arrived I just planned on flipping to the recipe pages, reading them then reselling it. But instead I started at the cover page and I was hooked. Learning about Aaron''s humble beginnings and all the struggles he went through with the personal stories really had me hooked. I''m not a huge reader so it had me surprised that every night I read about 6 pages. By the way there isn''t any secret cooking techniques in it. But there are great stories, tips and tricks of a man that started with a COS and worked his way up to world domination in bbq. All in all it''s a great book and I cant wait for the next one.
15 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

CQ
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
More for serious bbq smokers!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 21, 2018
I found the contents of this book disappointing by comparison with other books available for purchase at the same price. A lot of subject matter is about the author and his restaurant interspersed with some information a beginner may find useful. The specific details seem...See more
I found the contents of this book disappointing by comparison with other books available for purchase at the same price. A lot of subject matter is about the author and his restaurant interspersed with some information a beginner may find useful. The specific details seem lacking in many areas as if the author is more interested in protecting and plugging his business. It isn''t until page 134 that the reader is finally provided with some recipes. These are written in a good level of detail but are provided in short supply - I counted 4 meat recipes, a smattering of sides and sauces yet other sections go into great detail about smokers and how to make one. The logic one would apply would be if I am buying and reading a book about bbq smoking I am not likely to have the experience that I am at the semi pro stage of fabricating my own smoker from scratch! If you are new to bbq smoking (such as many over here in the UK) this is not the book for you. If this is a serious hobby for you and you want to take your abilities to new levels then read this book.
39 people found this helpful
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Mikeyvegas
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Complete idiots guide to Texas bbq / smoking
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 9, 2020
This is a review for Franklin’s barbeque guide. When we talk about barbeque in Texas, it’s not the same thing as barbeque in the UK. In texas barbeque is a smoking process where one has a fire in one area and a cooking grate in another and the smoke from the fire passes...See more
This is a review for Franklin’s barbeque guide. When we talk about barbeque in Texas, it’s not the same thing as barbeque in the UK. In texas barbeque is a smoking process where one has a fire in one area and a cooking grate in another and the smoke from the fire passes over the meat at quite low temperature to cook. The meat absorbs the smoke flavour and cooks very slowly, rendering fat and producing succulent flavoursome results. In The UK barbeque is cooking directly over a heat source outside - in texas they call this grilling, and in England we call Texas barbeque smoking. OK now that’s cleared up let’s get to the book. Franklin has a restaurant in Austin Texas that has lines of people up the street every day. He is famous for the quality of his smoked brisket and ribs. He is thought of as a genius who has some black art secrets to making his food so good. In this book he shares those secrets. In fact more than that, he tells you “How to” from making a smoker from scratch right through purchasing meat, preparing, cooking, cutting serving, cooking accompaniments. The whole deal. So theoretically if you read and execute everything in this book your food will be as good and identical to his. Now I can’t claim to have achieved quite that, but his guidance certainly corrected many basic errors I was making.
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BadGene
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
More philosophy than recipe, this is the fundamental text for bbq
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 27, 2020
Don''t expect loads of recipes in this book. It''s not about that - it''s got a few for sure but this is a master of his craft passing on his wisdom with humour, humility and a passion that shines through. BBQ is not about "put this rub on, cook for this long", it''s about...See more
Don''t expect loads of recipes in this book. It''s not about that - it''s got a few for sure but this is a master of his craft passing on his wisdom with humour, humility and a passion that shines through. BBQ is not about "put this rub on, cook for this long", it''s about feel, about care and attention to all the variables: smoker, wood, fire, meat, rub and time. Franklin shares his insight hard won through years of perfecting his craft and encourages you to find your own way of getting that perfect brisket. And got to say cooked the best brisket I''ve done yet, 203 is indeed magic.
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Ben
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A MUST OWN FOR SMOKER / BBQ ENTHUSIASTS
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 11, 2019
This book is not full of hundreds of recipes that you won''t use - it concentrates on a few amazing dishes that the chef is renowned for creating and dedicates pages into how you can achieve these results yourself! Half the book I used to learn ALOT about smokers, wood and...See more
This book is not full of hundreds of recipes that you won''t use - it concentrates on a few amazing dishes that the chef is renowned for creating and dedicates pages into how you can achieve these results yourself! Half the book I used to learn ALOT about smokers, wood and fires and the other half is a ''go to'' reference point for when I''m cooking!
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Spyda
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great technical information
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 4, 2020
Great book lots of technical information about bbq Smokers including picking building and modding, aslo a few simple recipes given as a starting point to allow you to create your own tasty food.... The way its written is easy to understand and keeps you interested.. Great...See more
Great book lots of technical information about bbq Smokers including picking building and modding, aslo a few simple recipes given as a starting point to allow you to create your own tasty food.... The way its written is easy to understand and keeps you interested.. Great book for the more technical aspects of smoking.
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Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale

Franklin 2021 Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto high quality [A Cookbook] online sale