How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

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One of Entertainment Weekly''s Top 10 Nonfiction Books of the Decade

A definitive history of the successful battle to halt the AIDS epidemic, here is the incredible story of the grassroots activists whose work turned HIV from a mostly fatal infection to a manageable disease. Almost universally ignored, these men and women learned to become their own researchers, lobbyists, and drug smugglers, established their own newspapers and research journals, and went on to force reform in the nation’s disease-fighting agencies. From the creator of, and inspired by, the seminal documentary of the same name, How to Survive a Plague is an unparalleled insider’s account of a pivotal moment in the history of American civil rights.

Review

One of Slate''s Best Nonfiction Books of the Past 25 Years and one of LitHub''s Best Nonfiction Works of the Decade

“Breathtakingly important. . . . David France managed to simultaneously break my heart and rekindle my anger.” —Steven Petrow, The Washington Post

“Inspiring. We owe so much to those brave activists and to Mr. France for writing this vital book.” —Anderson Cooper, The Wall Street Journal
 
“France delivers a monumental punch in the gut; his book is as moving and involving as a Russian novel. . . . An intimate, searing memoir and a vivid, detailed history.” — The Washington Post

“A riveting, galvanizing account.” — The New Yorker
 
“So real to someone who witnessed it that I had to put this volume down and catch my breath.” —Andrew Sullivan, The New York Times Book Review
 
“A remarkably written and highly relevant record of what angry, invested citizens can come together to achieve, and a moving and instructive testament to one community’s refusal—in the face of ignorance, hatred and death—to be silenced or to give up.” — Chicago Tribune

About the Author

DAVID FRANCE is the author of  Our Fathers, a book about the Catholic sexual abuse scandal, which Showtime adapted into a film. He coauthored  The Confessionwith former New Jersey governor Jim McGreevey. He is a contributing editor for  New York and has written as well for  The New York Times. His documentary film  How to Survive a Plague was an Oscar finalist, won a Directors Guild Award and a Peabody Award, and was nominated for two Emmys, among other accolades. His book of the same title won a Baillie Gifford Prize, a Green Carnation Prize, the Israel Fishman Nonfiction Award, a Lambda Literary award, the Randy Shilts Award, and a National Lesbian & Gay Journalist Association award for excellence in HIV/AIDS coverage. It was shortlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence and the Wellcome Prize in Literature. The author lives in New York City. 

www.davidfrance.com

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

I didn´t have serious concerns for my own health. What I worried about was Brian Gougeon. I checked on him frequently. Neither of us brought up AIDS directly or his health specifically, though I sensed he resented my calls as reminders of that scare. Like characters in a Saramago novel, we talked about anything else. The news was generally good. He resumed the physically taxing work of tending the vast vertical jungle of ficus trees and philodendron bushes that filled high-rises throughout the city. He confided that the East Village gallery scene had been cool to his work, but reported the good news that he was back with his college boyfriend, and had never been happier.

I don’t want to overstate our sense of impending doom. The truth was, the storm clouds massed near the horizon, not overhead. Unless you were personally admitted into what Susan Sontag called “the kingdom of the sick,” it was not hard to put the growing epidemic out of mind. It took two years and almost six hundred dead before The New York Times put a story on the front page. Except in passing, few television news programs made any mention. The progressive Village Voice ran a feature that called the danger overblown, and was nearly silent otherwise. You would have to read the Native for news on AIDS.

Brian Gougeon avoided the newspapers. I know he saw the first major report in prime time, since we watched it together on my small black-and-white TV. The ABC newsman Geraldo Rivera, flamboyant and hyperbolic though he was, broke the near-complete media blackout with the first network broadcast.

“It is the most frightening medical mystery of our time,” Rivera said, leaning toward the camera. “There is an epidemic loose in the land, a so-far incurable disease which kills its victims in stages.”

And then appeared the face of a man in grotesque medical distress— the first plague-sickened man either Brian or I had laid eyes on. He was a freelance lighting designer named Ken Ramsauer, age twenty-seven. In an old photograph, he looked as polished and angular as a shampoo model. The difference between then and now was shocking. His head appeared swollen nearly to the brink of popping; his eyes vanished behind swollen muffins of flesh; oblong purple marks covered his skin. Confined to a wheelchair, he hung his head weakly. A friend handed him a glass of water, which was almost too heavy for his trembling arms. “I thought I was a pretty good-looking guy,” he said. “And now, I actually see myself fading away.”

Ramsauer said he had just returned from the hospital, where they offered him neither medicine nor hope, and least of all pity. “One night I heard two, I believe, nurse’s aides—not the actual nurses—standing outside my door sort of laughing,” he said.

“What did they say exactly?” Rivera asked.

He blinked his slivered eyes and looked down at the water glass in his scarlet fists, remembering: “I wonder how long the faggot in 208 is going to last.”

Four days later, I opened the paper to discover that Ramsauer was dead. When I read that a public memorial was planned at the Naumburg Bandshell in Central Park, I asked Brian to go with me. But he was taking a different strategy. “I’m just staying out of the whole thing,” he said, meaning AIDS. “Worrying isn’t good for your health. And it does nasty things to your art.”

Instead I went with another friend, a graphic designer named Ian Horst. That evening was unusually still and hot. As we approached the service from the south, beneath a vaulted canopy of American elms and a row of towering statuary, a macabre scene confronted us. The plaza was crowded with 1,500 mourners cupping candles against the darkening sky. As our eyes landed on one young man after another, it became obvious that many of them were seriously ill. A dozen men were in wheelchairs, so wasted they looked like caricatures of starvation. I watched one young man twist in pain that was caused, apparently, by the barest gusts of wind around us. In New York there were just 722 cases reported, half the nation’s total. It seemed they were all at the band shell that sweltering evening.

My friend’s mouth hung open. “It looks like a horror flick,” he said.

I was speechless. We had found the plague.

From there, it was an avalanche. A Friday or two later, a colleague from work ran out the door for a weekend of social commitments. He looked as healthy as a soap opera star, which he aspired to be. We never saw him again. I heard from a mutual friend that he was found dead by neighbors the following week, shrunken and hollow, in a room washed in his own feces. In whispers, we wondered if he had taken his own life—and debated whether it would be more stoic to face the disease or commit suicide.

As the summer of 1983 opened, The New York Times finally started covering the plague, but often in bizarre ways. In May, the paper revealed that prisoners on Rikers Island had declared a hunger strike, unwilling to risk using plates or utensils after an inmate dropped dead from AIDS, and a week later reported on a sanitation worker who might have caught AIDS from handling trash. Readers were left more frightened than ever. We read reports of parents who would not go near their infected sons, not even to bid farewell. Many hospital workers felt the same way, abandoning AIDS-sick patients in diarrhea-soaked sheets out of fear and prejudice. Dr. Robert Gallo, head of the Laboratory of Tumor and Cell Biology at the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes of Health, was disgusted when he first heard the sick joke that pancakes were the only food fit for an AIDS patient, because they could fit under the door. In this environment, even doctors felt justified to exempt AIDS sufferers from the Hippocratic Oath—in one survey, over half admitted they would refuse them medical attention if given a choice.

The patients’ indignities did not end with death. Across New York, the global epicenter of this outbreak, almost every undertaker refused to work with the corpses. Even in the ancient plagues of Europe there were individuals tasked with collecting remains. In The Betrothed, the novelist Alessandro Manzoni called them monatti, those unflappable Samaritans who, for profit or otherwise, braved the “rags and corrupted bandages, infected straw, or clothes, or sheets” to convey the lifeless flesh to the ditches. In New York at the dawn of AIDS, only Redden’s Funeral Home, operating continuously since the Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918–19, would handle the embalming. Yet its owners begged the grateful mourners to keep their kindnesses a secret for fear of boycotts by the aging Catholic community in Greenwich Village and Chelsea, the bulk of their business.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
180 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Brookline Mike
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I was never bored and rarely confused
Reviewed in the United States on January 29, 2017
This is an astonishing book. Including the glossary and notes, it tops 600 pages. I am not a fast reader, and I read it in a week. I should say at the outset that I had a personal interest in the material, having lost a partner to AIDS in Boston in 1984 and many friends in... See more
This is an astonishing book. Including the glossary and notes, it tops 600 pages. I am not a fast reader, and I read it in a week. I should say at the outset that I had a personal interest in the material, having lost a partner to AIDS in Boston in 1984 and many friends in the subsequent years. This book has frequently been compared to Randy Shilts'' "And the Band Played On" but is more tightly focussed on the formation of ACT UP and its impact on the ultimate development of life-saving drugs. Despite a staggering amount of detail, I was never bored and rarely confused, a testament to Mr. France''s meticulous presentation of material. While it often reads as a chronicle of failures, both by government officials and pharmaceutical companies, the author never lets the reader move away from a connection to real people doing deeply committed work under the worst possible circumstances. I cared about them personally and ached for their suffering as year after year passed with only AZT, a drug toxic for most patients and with terrible side effects, to turn to. I hope that there is a special place in Hell for Burroughs-Wellcome executives, Ronald Reagan, Archbishop John O''Conner and Senator Jesse Helms, people who intentionally held back progress on finding a cure for AIDS for their own financial benefit or out of some perverted religious belief.

I bought a copy of the documentary of the same name last year and was deeply moved. There is a visceral difference between reading about Peter Staley scaling the entrance to buildings at the FDA and the NIH and seeing a video taken of the event. I watched the dvd again after finishing the book and felt devastated all over again. Reading the book had deepened my understanding of what happened and my love for the people involved, and seeing them on film, so many of whom died, broke my heart. It''s worth having your heart broken to read this book.
33 people found this helpful
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A. Acheson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well researched, thorough study of the first 16 years of the AIDS virus with special focus on ACT UP.
Reviewed in the United States on January 4, 2017
Just finished this book. It was so good. I''ve read "and the band played on" and loved it but this was much better researched especially because it was done with 20/20 hindsight and not when AIDS was still killing tens of thousands of people per year. The... See more
Just finished this book. It was so good. I''ve read "and the band played on" and loved it but this was much better researched especially because it was done with 20/20 hindsight and not when AIDS was still killing tens of thousands of people per year.

The book was mostly focused on what happened in NYC and Act-up (Vs. SF based.) What ACT UP! did was truly astounding. They changed the way drug trials were done, the speed of them, how people were found for them, got companies to do parallel studies without placebos for those who didn''t meet the stiff criteria of official studies, and most importantly, broke down the secretive doors of pharmaceutical companies and got them to involve People with AIDS in all sort of ways, to the benefit of the companies and the people who needed the drugs.

It''s hard to believe what it was like back then PWA''s when it was basically a death sentence for everyone.... Hard to fathom what they went through-the utter despair when dozens and dozens of friends and lovers would die a year. And the way gay people were treated and discriminated against-it is so unbelievable. And the horrible way Reagan and the Republicans (and to a large extent, Democrats too) in congress ignore AIDS for 9 years because they disliked gayness and thought that AIDS was god''s retribution.

It was an enthralling and horrifying book. Very well researched, a little slow in the beginning but it really gets interesting about 1/3 of the way through.
14 people found this helpful
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H. Milk
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If AIDS was a test of who we are as a people, most of our institutions failed the test...
Reviewed in the United States on April 3, 2018
An extraordinarily detailed, judiciously worded history of the grassroots response to the HIV/AIDS crisis in the U.S. by a front-line witness and journalist. France''s account is exhaustive but highly readable. For those of us who lived this history, the reading can be... See more
An extraordinarily detailed, judiciously worded history of the grassroots response to the HIV/AIDS crisis in the U.S. by a front-line witness and journalist. France''s account is exhaustive but highly readable. For those of us who lived this history, the reading can be emotionally tough at times. The callous, massive, immoral indifference of the medical, public health, research, social service, and government institutions to the mass death of Americans gives lie to the myth that America was or is "great" at anything. Rather, its initial response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic needs to be listed among the world''s most notorious genocides: by Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, and here, Reagan and Bush. And that''s no hyperbole: in 2016 1.2 million American are living with HIV; over 650,000 have died since the disease was first recognized in the early 1980s. Many of those deaths could have been prevented had our medical, public health, scientific, social service, and government bureaucracies not ranked bigotry and ''morality'' over health and life. This book is a chronicle of their callous indifference to suffering and pain, for which there can never be enough apologies or accountability. The hypocrisy and inhumanity on display at every level of American society is truly stunning. But it''s also a chronicle of how those most despised and marginalized by American society rose above their burden to create changes that ended up benefiting the entire country through speedier drug trials, a patient''s right to caring treatment, the consideration of patient voices when creating treatment protocols, etc. From what reservoir of strength and energy they drew upon to bring this about, I will never understand. Against institutional failure, France''s account is the story of inexplicable heroes we did not deserve. How to survive a plague is a must read for anyone interested in the history of social justice movements, the democratization of science and medicine, the history of conservative religious and political hypocrisy, and the patient''s rights movement.
4 people found this helpful
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DCwashington
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent..a must read
Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2021
This book a well written, easy read, and comprehensive narrative of the AIDS epidemic. It should be a must read for anybody who has an interest in the history of the disease and it''s devastating toll on a whole generation of gay men. The similarities to the covid pandemic... See more
This book a well written, easy read, and comprehensive narrative of the AIDS epidemic. It should be a must read for anybody who has an interest in the history of the disease and it''s devastating toll on a whole generation of gay men. The similarities to the covid pandemic are beyond obvious. For people who didn''t live through it the book is an indictment of another president who refused to even acknowledge the disease and the impact it was having on the country. It took him 6 years to even say the word "AIDS" and he eventually did it only because Elizabeth Taylor devoted a lot of energy and time convincing him to take the blinders off. In covid we all saw the tragedy of patients dying without their loved ones being able to be with them at the end. For many people this was a reminder of the thousands of AIDS patients who died alone except for medical staff. The difference between the two diseases is that AIDS patients'' loved ones choose not to be there.
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morehumanthanhumanTop Contributor: Graphic Novels
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Really, really good.
Reviewed in the United States on January 15, 2020
The author does a fantastic job of clearly laying out the complex organizational and personal webs involved in the early years of the battle against HIV/AIDS in New York City (to be clear, this is a very NYCcentric story, events in California and the rest of the country are... See more
The author does a fantastic job of clearly laying out the complex organizational and personal webs involved in the early years of the battle against HIV/AIDS in New York City (to be clear, this is a very NYCcentric story, events in California and the rest of the country are mostly recounted as asides, only the most significant international events are mentioned). It''s also a fantastic example of how to write history about events in which one is personally invested, with the author covering his own work as a journalist, the loss of friends and partners, and even his own fears of illness.

This is a really, really good book.
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Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good Read
Reviewed in the United States on April 5, 2020
The author delves deeply into the background of characters behind the AIDS epidemic of which there were many. Dr. Robert Fauci figures large. Admittedly, I found it somewhat tedious at times, getting into the weeds on seemingly side issues. Recommend.
One person found this helpful
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Laura
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Tough to get through
Reviewed in the United States on May 13, 2017
For others, I''m sure this is a great book. The topic is relevant, interesting, and motivational. The author uses language that isn''t difficult to understand for an average reader. But there are so many characters and the relationships were very complex. I actually made a... See more
For others, I''m sure this is a great book. The topic is relevant, interesting, and motivational. The author uses language that isn''t difficult to understand for an average reader. But there are so many characters and the relationships were very complex. I actually made a chart! Now, I''m SURE this is all factual, but the reading was difficult for me (and I''m a pretty good reader!) I''ll chalk it up to being too busy to really engage this text, but unless you have a lot of time, concentration, and patience, this might not be the best choice.
2 people found this helpful
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Richard S. Wilson
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Three stars is "it''s okay," and ... it''s okay.
Reviewed in the United States on May 2, 2017
I have some personal experience with this movement, time and place, so was maybe expecting too much. If you''re interested in the earliest days of AIDS treatment revolving around a very few people, it works well enough. As a chronicle of the electric atmosphere and intensity... See more
I have some personal experience with this movement, time and place, so was maybe expecting too much. If you''re interested in the earliest days of AIDS treatment revolving around a very few people, it works well enough. As a chronicle of the electric atmosphere and intensity of ACT UP, not so much. Sometimes a slog. I donated it to the "little library" across the street from my apartment when I was finished.
3 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Nicholas Smith
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful but upsetting read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 5, 2019
This is a really important book that highlights the devastation that took place to the gay community in America and gives the sense of how quickly it took hold and how out of step the medical and political establishment were. However due to the nature of the subject matter...See more
This is a really important book that highlights the devastation that took place to the gay community in America and gives the sense of how quickly it took hold and how out of step the medical and political establishment were. However due to the nature of the subject matter and how personally involved the author was, it is a distressing read but one I think most people should make the effort to engage with before this just becomes another facet of history
2 people found this helpful
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BookwormBev
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Important, emotional and powerful work.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 19, 2018
David France has produced an incredible piece of work here. Social, scientific and political history are beautifully combined with personal memories to form an emotionally charged and powerful book .
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marie jackson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic!!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 27, 2017
Fantastic book, makes you aware of what really is happening around world....it''s a must read book...
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K. D. Booles
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 15, 2017
brilliant book
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 13, 2020
Really enjoying this so far - especially during covid
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How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

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How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

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How to Survive a Plague: outlet sale The Story of How Activists and Scientists 2021 Tamed AIDS sale

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