Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and outlet online sale Fall of Slavery in the New sale World outlet online sale

Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and outlet online sale Fall of Slavery in the New sale World outlet online sale

Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and outlet online sale Fall of Slavery in the New sale World outlet online sale
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David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World. His books have won every major history award--including the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award--and he has been universally praised for his prodigious research, his brilliant analytical
skill, and his rich and powerful prose. Now, in Inhuman Bondage, Davis sums up a lifetime of insight in what Stanley L. Engerman calls "a monumental and magisterial book, the essential work on New World slavery for several decades to come."

Davis begins with the dramatic Amistad case, which vividly highlights the international character of the Atlantic slave trade and the roles of the American judiciary, the presidency, the media, and of both black and white abolitionists. The heart of the book looks at slavery in the American South,
describing black slaveholding planters, the rise of the Cotton Kingdom, the daily life of ordinary slaves, the highly destructive internal, long-distance slave trade, the sexual exploitation of slaves, the emergence of an African-American culture, and much more. But though centered on the United
States, the book offers a global perspective spanning four continents. It is the only study of American slavery that reaches back to ancient foundations (discussing the classical and biblical justifications for chattel bondage) and also traces the long evolution of anti-black racism (as in the
writings of David Hume and Immanuel Kant, among many others). Equally important, it combines the subjects of slavery and abolitionism as very few books do, and it illuminates the meaning of nineteenth-century slave conspiracies and revolts, with a detailed comparison with 3 major revolts in the
British Caribbean. It connects the actual life of slaves with the crucial place of slavery in American politics and stresses that slavery was integral to America''s success as a nation--not a marginal enterprise.

A definitive history by a writer deeply immersed in the subject, Inhuman Bondage offers a compelling narrative that links together the profits of slavery, the pain of the enslaved, and the legacy of racism. It is the ultimate portrait of the dark side of the American dream. Yet it offers an
inspiring example as well--the story of how abolitionists, barely a fringe group in the 1770s, successfully fought, in the space of a hundred years, to defeat one of human history''s greatest evils.

From Publishers Weekly

Pulitzer Prize-winner Davis follows Challenging the Boundaries of Slavery with this impressive and sprawling history of "human attempts to dehumanize other people" that focuses extensively on slave rebellions. These counter-attempts, Davis argues, are what form the base of the identities and communities of the descendants of New World slaves. In charting the evolution of slavery and societies'' responses to it from 71 BCE to 1948, Davis author shows how ancient slavery practices mirrored the process of animal domestication, explores the moral conflicts the United States faced during the American Revolution and how the Haitian revolutions disrupted the class system. A lengthy and especially informative study of British and American abolitionist movements paves the way for a concise breakdown of American slavery politics during the Civil War and reconstruction. Davis''s account is rich in detail, and his voice is clear enough to coax even casual readers through this dense history.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

History professor Davis places American slavery in the broader global context as part of the world''s first system of multinational production from which mass markets were served. American slaves from West Africa produced commodities that fueled European expansion and the settlement of America. At its peak, American slave labor helped to maximize production for international markets. Davis emphasizes the dehumanizing nature of American slavery and the reliance on racial differences, i.e., between blacks and Native Americans, to solidify social and economic differences. Exploring the origins of antiblack racism, Davis examines nineteenth-century slave revolts, the Civil War, and emancipation. The Amistad case, involving African slaves who commandeered their slave ship and eventually sued for their freedom, provides the basis of an analysis of multinational charters of the Atlantic slave trade. The broader perspective on American slavery--its social and economic impact on the growth of the U.S.--forces readers to face the contradictions between our democratic ideals and economic impulses. Vernon Ford
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review


"Davis is always judicious and thought-provoking while providing a well-written summation of 20th century scholarship for general readers. Essential."--R.T. Brown, CHOICE


" Inhuman Bondage is, in essence, a retrospective: a brilliant and nuanced summing up of nearly fifty years'' scholarship on slavery and abolition, much of it pioneered by Davis himself....It is a masterful study: broad in conception, bang up to date, consistently challenging, accessible and
beautifully written."--John Oldfield, Patterns of Prejudice


" Inhuman Bondage lives up to what readers expect from Davis: it is engagingly written and impressively broad in its scope and analysis."--Laurent Dubois, American Historical Reivew


"A tour de force....Could not be more welcome....Davis follows the large story of slavery into all corners of the Atlantic world, demonstrating that hardly anyone or anything was untouched by it. He is particularly interested in the way ideas shaped slavery''s development. But ''Inhuman Bondage'' is
not a history without people. Princes, merchants and reformers of all sorts play their role, though Davis gives pride of place to the men and women who suffered bondage. Drawing on some of the best recent studies, he not only adjudicates between the arguments, but also provides dozens of new
insights, large and small, into events as familiar as the revolt on Saint-Domingue (now Haiti) and the American Civil War....An invaluable guide to explaining what has made slavery''s consequences so much a part of contemporary American culture and politics."--Ira Berlin, The New York Times Book
Review


"Davis masterfully navigates the long history of slavery from ancient times to its abolition in the 19th century....Succeeds heroically in wrestling a vast amount of material from diverse cultures. The result is a sinewy book that combines erudition and everyday detail into a gripping, often
surprising, narrative."--Fergus M. Bordewich, Wall Street Journal


"David Brion Davis has been the preeminent historian of ideas about slavery in the Western world since the early modern period....Davis, a leading practitioner of intellectual and cultural history, has now gone far beyond the history of ideas and attempted to study New World slavery in all its
ramifications, social, economic, and political, as well as intellectual and cultural....He convincingly demonstrates that slavery was central to the history of the New World."--George M. Fredrickson, The New York Review of Books


"David Brion Davis, our greatest historian of slavery and abolition, weaves together here one of the central stories of modern world history--and does so with a power, authority, and grace that is his alone."--Edward L. Ayers, author of In the Presence of Mine Enemies: War in the Heart of America,
1859-1863


"Ranging from ancient Babylonia to the modern Western Hemisphere, David Brion Davis offers a concise history of slavery and its abolition that once again reminds us why he is the foremost scholar of international slavery. There is no more up-to-date account of this pivotal aspect of the world''s
history."--Eric Foner, author of Reconstruction: America''s Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877


"Impressive and sprawling....Davis''s account is rich in detail, and his voice is clear enough to coax even casual readers through this dense history."-- Publishers Weekly


"In this gracefully fashioned masterpiece, David Brion Davis draws on a lifetime of scrupulous scholarship in order to trace the sources and highlight the distinctiveness of America''s central paradox by situating it in both its New World and Western contexts. His powerful narrative is enhanced and
deepened by persuasively rendered details. For students of slavery, and of American history more generally, it is simply indispensable. With all the makings of a classic, Inhuman Bondage is the glorious culmination of the definitive series of studies on slavery by one of America''s greatest living
historians."--Orlando Patterson, author of Rituals of Blood: Consequences of Slavery in Two American Centuries


"No scholar has played a larger role in expanding contemporary understanding of how slavery shaped the history of the United States, the Americas and the world than David Brion Davis."--Ira Berlin, author of Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America


" Inhuman Bondage is a magisterial achievement, a model of comparative and interdisciplinary scholarship, and the best study we have of American slavery within the broader context of the New World. It is also a powerful and moving story, told by one of America''s greatest historians."--John Stauffer,
author of The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race


"This brilliant and gripping history of slavery in the New World summarizes and integrates the scholarship of the past half-century. It sparkles with insights that only an innovator of David Brion Davis''s caliber could command."--Robert William Fogel, author of The Slavery Debates, 1952-1990: A
Retrospective


About the Author


David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University and Director Emeritus of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, also at Yale. Best known for his highly acclaimed books The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture, The Problem of
Slavery in the Age of Revolution, 1770-1823, Slavery and Human Progress, and most recently, Challenging the Boundaries of Slavery, Davis has won a Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award for History and Biography, the Bancroft Prize, the Albert J. Beveridge Award, and the Bruce Catton Prize for
Lifetime Achievement, among other honors.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

mark bayer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A really good read.
Reviewed in the United States on March 19, 2020
I have studied the history of slavery around the world for nearly a decade and this is a really good book with clear and validating documentation. If you want to study this topic, this is a very good book.
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Barbara AKA Zinnia Grey
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Detailed book on the when, where, why, and who kept slaves through the history of many civilizations.
Reviewed in the United States on September 5, 2017
This is an intense work of anthropology, going way back through recorded history to document slavery in many ancient and not so ancient civilizations. It''s dogging me to study more intensively to find out how those nations managed to stop their dependence on slavery.... See more
This is an intense work of anthropology, going way back through recorded history to document slavery in many ancient and not so ancient civilizations. It''s dogging me to study more intensively to find out how those nations managed to stop their dependence on slavery.
It''s not just a study of racism, as many countries wanted slaves who looked much like themselves.

If you really want the details of when, where, and why people have kept slaves you''ll get your answers here.
My only regret is that he doesn''t have a bibliography.
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Apple
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
My only regret
Reviewed in the United States on June 10, 2013
My only regret is that I did not buy this in hard copy. The next time I read it, and I will read it again, it will be in hard copy so that I can make notes and take more time to analyze and study the information. Do not be afraid of the academic founding of this... See more
My only regret is that I did not buy this in hard copy. The next time I read it, and I will read it again, it will be in hard copy so that I can make notes and take more time to analyze and study the information.

Do not be afraid of the academic founding of this book. It is thought provoking, enlightening, challenging, and the passion of the author is evident. I have traveled a great deal around the world and the issue of poverty, especially extreme poverty, and slavery straddles a fine line. When a person, child or adult, is desperate for food, shelter, and a future it is very easy for them to be taken advantage of and placed in bondage and potentially in slavery.

One of the key actions in this book is to define slavery and one definition stood out remarkably to me - "denial of a social identity". Removing a person''s "social identity" denies that person human rights - such as the untouchables in India- denies them a voice in "democratic" countries - such as women who have no freedom without the presence of a male relative or the right to vote; denies them a place in society in order to obtain a job, build a home, have a family, and travel freely - as happened in the economically and politically motivated Apartheid of the United States and South Africa (that only came to a legal end in SA in 1994).

Denial of Social Identity is only one aspect of the many nuances of slavery. The author also separates slavery from racism. It is possible to be racist without the presence of slavery, but slavery, or the history of a race can have an enormous impact on how they are perceived in a specific society or cultural group.

The author explores these nuances and links the past with the present and on into the future. This is not just about slavery but how society can rationalize and justify its actions politically, economically, religiously, morally and ethically. It is how society can blind itself to it''s own lack of humanity.

I would recommend this book to high school students. It should be read, discussed, argued about.... because slavery and bondage is still part of our world; in many different forms.
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Starbright
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Scholarly approach to slavery is very inclusive
Reviewed in the United States on June 29, 2016
A very scholarly book with many interesting citations which kept me constantly turning to the back of the book for more information. Progress was very slow, but the density of information did not disappoint. Many details of conversations, letters, lectures and other... See more
A very scholarly book with many interesting citations which kept me constantly turning to the back of the book for more information. Progress was very slow, but the density of information did not disappoint. Many details of conversations, letters, lectures and other materials generated by the major players on both sides of the slavery issue provide much needed depth of understanding of the issues missing in many other books on the subject that just gloss over the issues with generalities. Personally, I would have preferred if many of the materials in the citations had been included in the main body of the book.
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Dr. Z
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic history of American slavery!
Reviewed in the United States on January 7, 2013
"Inhuman Bondage" is an engaging, well-written, and fascinating history of slavery in the Western Hemisphere. I have an interest in the Civil War, and picked out this book to provide some background to understanding the roots of slavery in the United States. I... See more
"Inhuman Bondage" is an engaging, well-written, and fascinating history of slavery in the Western Hemisphere.

I have an interest in the Civil War, and picked out this book to provide some background to understanding the roots of slavery in the United States. I couldn''t have picked out a better book!

Mr. Davis provides thorough coverage of every aspect of New World slavery, from its old world origins, to the history of abolitionism in England and America, to the end of American slavery with the Civil War. Davis has his own biases, but he doesn''t hide them, and succeeds in presenting opposing viewpoints.

While slavery was clearly a central theme towards the end of the war, there is less agreement about how important it was as its cause (vs. ''maintaining the Union''). Davis provides a convincing argument that slavery was, in fact, central to the very genesis of this conflict, with a degree of inevitability going all the way back to the founding of this country.

For any armchair Civil War historian, this is an essential (and enjoyable!) read. It is fascinating, engaging, and highly educational. Highly recommended!
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Eric Mayforth
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Abolition of a Hideous Wrong
Reviewed in the United States on February 7, 2011
The nineteenth century was one of momentous change, with life-improving technologies such as the railroad, the telegraph, the telephone, electricity, and anesthesia coming into widespread use. In addition to the technological changes, a colossally important moral... See more
The nineteenth century was one of momentous change, with life-improving technologies such as the railroad, the telegraph, the telephone, electricity, and anesthesia coming into widespread use. In addition to the technological changes, a colossally important moral improvement took place in the 1800s: the death of the institution of slavery in the Western world. David Brion Davis tells the important story of slavery''s welcome demise in "Inhuman Bondage."

What makes this very well-researched volume so valuable is that it discusses slavery not just in the United States, but in Britain, the Caribbean, and Latin America as well, and how the changes in the institution in one region affected it in the others. The author even talks about how events like the English Civil War and the London fire of 1666 influenced slavery in the New World. Most people associate slavery with cotton plantations, but Davis relates how diverse slavery was and how in practice it differed from region to region.

Davis tracks the abolitionist movement from the first antislavery documents in Pennsylvania in 1688 through the mid-nineteenth century and discusses how religion, the Declaration of Independence, and the American Revolution affected attitudes toward slavery. He also tells the story of the slave revolts, and shows the methods American slaves used to attempt to maintain a core of dignity and self-respect in the face of their oppression.

The author discusses how slavery affected nineteenth century American politics up through the 1850s and the election of 1860, and shows how Lincoln dealt with the issue over the course of the Civil War.

One need not agree with all of the conclusions that Davis arrives at to appreciate this book that chronicles the ultimate abolition of slavery, one of the greatest moral developments of the modern age.
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JagdishSagar
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great history, scholarly, and morally powerful because it is objective.
Reviewed in the United States on May 23, 2014
This is really one of the best books that I have read recently. It is objective, brings out the good with the bad in human nature, as it chronicles what in sum was the worst atrocity of modern times before the holocaust. Slavery has to be studied as an institution, an... See more
This is really one of the best books that I have read recently. It is objective, brings out the good with the bad in human nature, as it chronicles what in sum was the worst atrocity of modern times before the holocaust. Slavery has to be studied as an institution, an evil one but a complex one, not explained merely by a diatribe against the white man''s racism (though that was there and can''t be excused) but involving powerful economic factors as well. I am not a scholar of the subject, but have enough history to judge that if there are errors in this book, they would have to be errors of detail to be nitpicked over by academics; it is very complete and wholly persuasive on the broad picture, including the argument that ultimately slavery was abolished in the face of the economic interests of the countries involved, on the momentum of a moral movement initiated by genuinely altruistic persons.
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Michael
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Superb book
Reviewed in the United States on June 12, 2020
Excellent exposition by the late Professor Davis regarding the advent and destruction of slavery in the new world.
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Brandon wood
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great document of American Slavery
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 1, 2021
This offers a good view of the evil which was the slave trade in America, i think it would have benefitted from including information from all the other information and knowledge of slavery outside of America too but that doesn''t take away from the quality of this book
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S Wood
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
New World Slavery
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 24, 2010
Describing the rise and fall of slavery in the New World in a mere 320 pages is a demanding project for a historian, and one that David Brion Davis largely (with a few caveats) accomplishes with no small amount of skill in his book "Inhuman Bondage". The books begins with...See more
Describing the rise and fall of slavery in the New World in a mere 320 pages is a demanding project for a historian, and one that David Brion Davis largely (with a few caveats) accomplishes with no small amount of skill in his book "Inhuman Bondage". The books begins with the Amistad case from the late 1830''s which is somewhat at odds with the Spielberg version, though far more interesting and revealing for being so. Davis then makes room to contemplate the roots of slavery in the Near East, the Greek and Roman Empires, and on through history until it erupted into the New World with the "discoveries" of the late fifteenth century. This, for me, was the highlight of the book, and also includes reflections on the interaction between slavery and racism (and the accompanying arguments between cause and effect) as well as examining the Christian, Islamic, Jewish, Ancient World and Enlightenment views of race and slavery. As regards the main subject of the book, slavery in the New World, Davis focuses on the North American experience, followed by that of the Caribbean, with Brazilian slavery in the rear. Spanish slavery, except in so far as it applied to the Caribbean, is largely absent. Other subjects that receive attention are Slave revolts in the various colonies, the role of the Haitian revolt in the demise of Slavery, British and other European emancipation, the debates about the role slavery played in the industrial revolution, the American Civil War and emancipation, as well as the astonishing case of the Brazilian slave revolt that brought about emancipation in that country, the last in the Western hemisphere to do so. Paradoxically the actual day-to-day realities of the slaves and slavery remain relatively untouched by the text. I didn''t agree with all of Davis''s analysis, but to his credit he makes the reader aware of other historical views even if his dismissal of the connections between slavery and industrialisation is more than a little heavy handed. The book only truly irked with regard to Davis''s opinion on the Turner rebellion; his remark that the massacres of whites was brutal and counterproductive is reasonable, but to then go on an claim that this was little different psychologically from the mental state that leads to the genocide of Jews, is to put it politely, a grotesque overstatement. For a start the Nazis were not treated by the Jewish people in the way that White Americans treated Black slaves. If Davis himself applied this assertion systematically his account of the Haitian revolt would have been very different, and less enlightening for that. He certainly doesn''t apply it to the putting down of Slave revolts, including those in the British Caribbean where hundreds of blacks died, many cold bloodedly executed in response to wide spread insurrections that resulted in less than a handful of white deaths. In short, "Inhuman Bondage" is a thoroughly interesting exploration of New World slavery. As a book its fascinating and enlightened scholarship easily out-weigh its occasional defects. The accounts of the roots of slavery in the old world are easily, and somewhat perversely given the books title, the highlight of the book. Readers interested in reading further into the subject can do no worse than Robin Blackburn''s dense but comprehensive The Making of New World Slavery; for the Haitian revolt C.L.R. James The Black Jacobins is still a remarkable account; those interested in the experience of the North American mainland will find that Peter Kolchin''s American Slavery (1619-1877) will supply the details that are largely absent from Davis''s account, and Eric Foner''s Reconstruction is an immensely detailed account of the post-emancipation experience of American blacks.
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L. E.
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Useless
Reviewed in France on March 4, 2019
This book is exclusively about slaves in the USA and occasionaly about Haiti. Nothing at all about South America or slave trade in Africa itself..
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carol
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Hard book to read but because of the content!!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 24, 2014
At first we borrowed this book from the library but then realised that this is a book that we really should have on the book shelf at home. It Is a tough read but has factual content that is thought provoking. It is not a "sit by the pool" novel to read but even so,...See more
At first we borrowed this book from the library but then realised that this is a book that we really should have on the book shelf at home. It Is a tough read but has factual content that is thought provoking. It is not a "sit by the pool" novel to read but even so, I do seriously recommend it.
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Jazzyldy1
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 31, 2014
Invaluable. Well written. I also have the hard cover version.
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Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and outlet online sale Fall of Slavery in the New sale World outlet online sale

Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and outlet online sale Fall of Slavery in the New sale World outlet online sale

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