The 2021 Third Gate (Jeremy lowest Logan Series) online sale

The 2021 Third Gate (Jeremy lowest Logan Series) online sale

The 2021 Third Gate (Jeremy lowest Logan Series) online sale
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER An archaeological expedition digging where it shouldn’t ... A crown so powerful it is rumored to be cursed ... And the one man who can explain it all ...

Deep in a nearly impassable swamp south of the Egyptian border, an archaeological team is searching for the burial chamber of King Narmer, the fabled pharaoh. Narmer''s crown might be buried with him: the elusive "double" crown of the two Egypts. Amid the nightmarish, disorienting tangle of mud and dead vegetation, strange things begin to happen. Could an ancient curse be responsible? Jeremy Logan, history professor and master interpreter of bizarre and inexplicable enigmas, is brought onto the project to investigate. What he finds raises fresh questions ... and immediate alarm.

Review

“Lincoln Child’s novels are thrilling and tantalizing.” 
 — Vince Flynn

"By mixing fact and fiction as well as science and the occult, Lincoln Child once again has created an offbeat thriller that is both exciting and thoughtprovoking."
-- The Free Lance-Star

"Bestseller Child ( Terminal Freeze) more than succeeds in making a mummy''s curse terrifying in this superb supernatural thriller...Child evokes fear through understatement...Readers will hope to see more of [lead character] Logan in a sequel."
--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Ample gadgetry, New Age soul-shifting, and pyrotechnics sufficient to employ a stable of stuntmen when brought to film: Child’s newest is the sort of thing to delight all those who got wrapped up in  The Mummy. Think, a Dan Brown-ian adventure amongst Pharaohs ready with a pocket full of curses."
-- Kirkus 

"Its characters are well drawn, and the mystery is nicely handled, keeping readers guessing as to whether something supernatural is going on here. Of the author’s solo novels, this could be the best so far."
--Booklist

About the Author

LINCOLN CHILD is the New York Times best-selling author of Terminal Freeze, Deep Storm, Death Match, and Utopia, as well as coauthor, with Douglas Preston, of numerous New York Times best sellers, most recently Fever Dream. He lives with his wife and daughter in Morristown, New Jersey.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

Three Years Later

Growing up in Westport, currently teaching at Yale, Jeremy Logan thought himself familiar with his home state of Connecticut. But the stretch through which he now drove was a revelation. Heading east from Groton—­following the e-­mailed directions—­he’d turned onto US 1 and then, just past Stonington, onto US 1 Alternate. Hugging the gray Atlantic coastline, he’d passed Wequetequock, rolled over a bridge that looked as old as New England itself, then turned sharply right onto a well-­paved but unmarked road. Quite abruptly, the minimalls and tourist motels fell away behind. He passed a sleepy cove in which lobster boats bobbed at anchor, and then entered an equally sleepy hamlet. And yet it was a real village, a working village, with a general store and a tackle shop and an Episcopal church with a steeple three sizes too large, and gray-­shingled houses with trim picket fences painted white. There were no hulking SUVs, no out-­of-­state plates; and the scattering of people sitting on benches or leaning out of front windows waved to him as he passed. The April sunlight was strong, and the sea air had a clean, fresh bite to it. A signboard hanging from the doorframe of the post office informed him he was in Pevensey Point, population 182. Something about the place reminded him irresistibly of Herman Melville.

“Karen,” he said, “if you’d seen this place, you’d never have made us buy that summer cottage in Hyannis.”

Although his wife had died of cancer years ago, Logan still allowed himself to converse with her now and then. Of course it was usually—­though not always—­more monologue than conversation. At first, he’d been sure to do it only when he was certain not to be overheard. But then—­as what had started as a kind of intellectual hobby for him turned increasingly into a profession—­he no longer bothered to be so discreet. These days, judging by what he did for a living, people expected him to be a little strange.

Two miles beyond the town, precisely as the directions indicated, a narrow lane led off to the right. Taking it, Logan found himself in a sandy forest of thin scrub pine that soon gave way to tawny dunes. The dunes ended at a metal bridge leading to a low, broad island jutting out into Fishers Island Sound. Even from this distance, Logan could see there were at least a dozen structures on the island, all built of the same reddish-­brown stone. At the center were three large five-­story buildings that resembled dormitories, arranged in parallel, like dominos. At the far end of the island, partly concealed by the various structures, was an empty airstrip. And beyond everything lay the ocean and the dark green line of Rhode Island.

Logan drove the final mile, stopping at a gatehouse before the bridge. He showed the printed e-­mail to the guard inside, who smiled and waved him through. A single sign beside the gatehouse, expensive looking but unobtrusive, read simply cts.

He crossed the bridge, passed an outlying structure, and pulled into a parking lot. It was surprisingly large: there were at least a hundred cars and space for as many more. Nosing into one of the spots, he killed the engine. But instead of exiting, he paused to read the e-­mail once again.

Jeremy,

I’m pleased—­and relieved—­to hear of your acceptance. I also appreciate your being flexible, since as I mentioned earlier there’s no way yet to know how long your investigation will take. In any case you’ll receive a minimum of two weeks’ compensation, at the rate you specified. I’m sorry I can’t give you more details at this point, but you’re probably used to that. And I have to tell you I can’t wait to see you again after all this time.

Directions to the Center are below. I’ll be waiting for you on the morning of the 18th. Any time between ten and noon will be fine. One other thing: once you’re on board with the project, you might find it hard to get calls out with any degree of certainty, so please be sure you’ve cleared your decks before you arrive. Looking forward to the 18th!

Best,

E. R.

Logan glanced at his watch: eleven thirty. He turned the note over once in his hands. You might find it hard to get calls out with any degree of certainty. Why was that? Perhaps cell phone towers had never made it beyond picturesque Pevensey Point? Nevertheless, what the e-­mail said was true: he was “used to that.” He pulled a duffel bag from the passenger seat, slipped the note into it, and got out of the car.

Located in one of the central dormitory-­like buildings, Reception was an understated space that reminded Logan of a hospital or clinic: a half-­dozen empty chairs, tables with magazines and journals, a sprinkling of anonymous-­looking oil paintings on beige walls, and a single desk occupied by a woman in her mid-­thirties. The letters CTS were set into the wall behind her, once again with no indication of what they might stand for.

Logan gave his name to the woman, who in response looked at him with a mixture of curiosity and uneasiness. He took a seat in one of the vacant chairs, expecting a protracted wait. But no sooner had he picked up a recent issue of Harvard Medical Review than a door across from the receptionist opened and Ethan Rush emerged.

“Jeremy,” Rush said, smiling broadly and extending his hand. “Thank you so much for coming.”

“Ethan,” Logan replied, shaking the proffered hand. “Nice to see you again.”

He hadn’t seen Rush since their days at Johns Hopkins twenty years before, when he’d been doing graduate studies and Rush had been attending the medical school. But the man who stood before him retained a remarkable youthfulness. Only a fine tracery of lines at the corners of his eyes bore testament to the passage of years. And yet in the simple act of shaking the man’s hand, Logan had received two very clear impressions from Rush: a shattering, life-­changing event and an unswerving, almost obsessive, devotion to a cause.

Dr. Rush glanced around the reception area. “You brought your luggage?”

“It’s in my trunk.”

“Give me the keys, I’ll see that somebody retrieves it for you.”

“It’s a Lotus Elan S four.”

Rush whistled. “The roadster? What year?”

“Nineteen sixty-­eight.”

“Very nice. I’ll make sure they treat it with kid gloves.”

Logan dug into his pocket and handed the keys to Rush, who in turn gave them to the receptionist with some whispered instructions. Then he turned and motioned Logan to follow him through the open doorway.

Taking an elevator to the top floor, Rush led the way down a long hallway that smelled faintly of cleaning fluid and chemicals. The resemblance to a hospital grew stronger—­and yet it seemed to be a hospital without patients; the few people they passed were dressed in street clothes, ambulatory, and obviously healthy. Logan peered curiously into the open doorways as they walked by. He saw conference rooms, a large, empty lecture hall with seats for at least a hundred, laboratories bristling with equipment, what appeared to be a reference library full of paperbound journals and dedicated terminals. More strangely, he noticed several apparently identical rooms, each containing a single, narrow bed with literally dozens—­if not hundreds—­of wires leading to nearby monitoring instruments. Other doors were closed, their small windows covered by privacy curtains. A group of men and women in white lab coats passed them in the hallway. They glanced at Logan, nodded to Rush.

Stopping before a door marked director, Rush opened it and beckoned Logan through an anteroom housing two secretaries and a profusion of bookcases into a private office beyond. It was tastefully decorated, as minimalist as the outer office was crowded. Three of the walls held spare postmodernist paintings in cool blues and grays; the fourth wall appeared to be entirely of glass, covered at the moment by blinds.

In the center of the room was a teakwood table, polished to a brilliant gleam and flanked by two leather chairs. Rush took one and ushered Logan toward the other.

“Can I offer you anything?” the director asked. “Coffee, tea, soda?”

Logan shook his head.

Rush crossed one leg over the other. “Jeremy, I have to be frank. I wasn’t sure you’d be willing to take on this assignment, given how busy you are . . . and how closemouthed I was concerning the particulars.”

“You weren’t sure—­even given the fee I charged?”

Rush smiled. “It’s true—­your fee is certainly healthy. But then your, ah, work has become somewhat high profile recently.” He hesitated. “What is it you call your profession again?”

“I’m an enigmalogist.”

“Right. An enigmalogist.” Rush glanced curiously at Logan. “And it’s true you were able to document the existence of the Loch Ness monster?”

“You’d have to take that up with my client for that particular assignment, the University of Edinburgh.”

“Serves me right for asking.” Rush paused. “Speaking of universities, you are a professor, aren’t you?”

“Medieval history. At Yale.”

“And what do they think of your other profession at Yale?”

“High visibility is never a problem. It helps guarantee a large admissions pool.” Logan glanced around the office. He’d often found that new clients preferred to talk about his past accomplishments. It postponed discussion of their own problems.

“I remember those . . . investigations you did at the Peabody Institute and the Applied Physics Lab back in school,” Rush said. “Who would have thought they’d lead you to this?”

“Not me, certainly.” Logan shifted in his seat. “So. Care to tell me just what CTS stands for? Nothing around here seems to give any clue.”

“We do keep our cards pretty close to our vest. Center for Transmortality Studies.”

“Transmortality Studies,” Logan repeated.

Rush nodded. “I founded CTS two years ago.”

Logan glanced at him in surprise. “You founded the Center?”

Rush took a deep breath. A grim look came over his face. “You see, Jeremy, it’s like this. Just over three years ago, I was working an ER shift when my wife, Jennifer, was brought in by paramedics. She’d been in a terrible accident and was completely unresponsive. We tried everything—­heart massage, paddles—­but it was hopeless. It was the worst moment of my life. There I was, not only unable to save my own wife . . . but I was expected to pronounce her dead, as well.”

Logan shook his head in sympathy.

“Except that I didn’t. I couldn’t bring myself to do it. Against the advice of the assisting doctors I continued heroic measures.” He leaned forward. “And, Jeremy—­she pulled through. I finally revived her, fourteen minutes after all brain function had ceased.”

“How?”

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4.2 out of 54.2 out of 5
1,502 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Tripower53
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good novel, Mr. Child
Reviewed in the United States on December 12, 2017
4 stars In this book we meet Jeremy Logan, a new hero for Lincoln Child. He is an “enigmalogist.” That is someone who investigates unknown phenomena such as hauntings or other unexplained occurrences. This is Jeremy’s word for what he does. He is a professor of... See more
4 stars

In this book we meet Jeremy Logan, a new hero for Lincoln Child. He is an “enigmalogist.” That is someone who investigates unknown phenomena such as hauntings or other unexplained occurrences. This is Jeremy’s word for what he does. He is a professor of medieval history at a university when he is not exploring the unknown.

He receives a request from Dr. Ethan Rush a former surgeon whose wife had a near death experience. He has a proposition for Jeremy. Tantalizingly slowly, Jeremy draws the mission out of him. They are to join an expedition of the famous explorer Peter Stone in attempting to locate the tomb of Narmer, the king who was supposed to have unified Egypt in approximately 3200 BC. Mr. Stone suspects and hopes that King Narmer’s crown is buried with him.

The problem is that the location of the tomb is in the Sudd, a location in northern Sudan that is all but impassible and is a growing swamp. Isolated and growing larger by the day, the task is on a heroic scale. One of the archeologists Christina Romero shows Jeremy a document that she says is the reason he is at the site. The lead archeologist is the famous Fenwick March. On the paper is described a curse to be released if anyone disturbs the tomb.

The mysterious occurrences and accidents keep happening at the site. Then things go from bad to worse.

This is an action-filled thrill ride. It combines the average person’s fascination with ancient Egypt with a historical take on an adventure story. It is well written and plotted. I liked Jeremy Logan and his theories don’t sound so far-fetched. Well done, Mr. Child. I will continue to read his books, along with those he writes with Douglas Preston.
18 people found this helpful
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Travis
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Suspense, Thrills and More than a touch of the Supernatural
Reviewed in the United States on May 22, 2018
An excellent, well written novel that will appeal to readers who enjoy a good thriller with a supernatural twist. The author does not make the supernatural elements so heavy handed as to move the book into the fantasy realm but the psychic/occult elements leave the reader... See more
An excellent, well written novel that will appeal to readers who enjoy a good thriller with a supernatural twist. The author does not make the supernatural elements so heavy handed as to move the book into the fantasy realm but the psychic/occult elements leave the reader wondering just what the heck is going on, all through the book. Add to that the interesting Egyptian archeological elements, twisted into a story about the first pharaoh of unified Egypt and this story has something for everyone.
10 people found this helpful
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Michael E LaRiviere
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
When the dead protect the dead, the living should beware - An exciting scientific and high tech journey into the Arcane
Reviewed in the United States on May 19, 2013
The Third Gate combines the best efforts of a leading Egyptologist, enigmologist (someone who specializes in enigmas), an uber-rich treasure hunter, a spattering of archeologists, the best high technologists money can buy, medical doctors, a previously dead woman, and a... See more
The Third Gate combines the best efforts of a leading Egyptologist, enigmologist (someone who specializes in enigmas), an uber-rich treasure hunter, a spattering of archeologists, the best high technologists money can buy, medical doctors, a previously dead woman, and a space station-like work center. All this and these sit amid the world’s most formidable and impenetrable swamp called the Sudd on the Nile River.

No expenses have been spared in setting up a self-sufficient, scientifically competent, well supplied lab and tunnel visioned task force dedicated to finding the unbelievably well hidden tomb of an ancient pharaoh. There is also a curse worthy to be called a curse.

Lincoln Child did his homework to come up with this techno archaic science fiction fact-filled fiction novel that throws in sufficient names and real historical instances to establish credibility with the story line. The author’s in-depth research is apparent and produces an interesting read that moves along quickly and has a surprise at every juncture.

This treasure hunting backdrop combines its suspense and often eerie sequence of events with the subject of near death experiences. The reader is presented with the unique possibility of invasion or possession of a body by a spirit other than that of the deceased due to modern medicine taking too long to resuscitate the almost corpse.

If one believes in the occult afterlife that prompted the building of the pyramids and well stocked tombs of the early Egyptian kings or pharaohs, this book will guarantee aaahs and ooohs. Egyptology tidbits will delight the discerning history buff.

Fighting the looming deadline of a dam completion that will terminate their efforts, the crew of this discovery operation tastes victory, albeit short lived. The terrible wrath and power of something or someone lashes out to wreak havoc on the modern humans that have set their greedy minds on ransacking the ancient sacred tomb and disturbing the rest of its chief occupant.

The interesting death duel that ensues diminishes the edge provided by science and money and ushers many of the best equipped and brilliant professionals into the netherworld they so ineptly and sacreligiously have invaded.

The final battle against the terrible and sickening Sudd swamp is masterfully waged by Lincoln Child as he describes the ugliest, most repulsive, completely overwhelming, naturally produced slime and pit of decay imaginable.

The plot is somewhat predictable, but the twists and turn are priceless and leave the reader wanting more. The characters are charming, greedy, believable, well crafted, and interesting. Nothing was left out of this fine work of a highly creative imagination and excellent wordsmith. The reader can almost smell the rotting botanical ooze, feel the mosquitoes and hear them buzz, and in the end, feel the compressed mass become a death shroud about their sinking bodies.

This book is recommended for anyone who really likes adventure mixed with reality and fed to them as fast as they can devour it.
12 people found this helpful
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Cookie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Mystery of an Egyptian Tomb
Reviewed in the United States on June 30, 2020
Jeremy is asked to come on an adventure without knowing what it is about until he is on the plane headed toward Eygpt. Facts are in short supply as he learns about the king who united upper and lower Eygpt. They are looking for his tomb in the Sud; a very unfriendly place.... See more
Jeremy is asked to come on an adventure without knowing what it is about until he is on the plane headed toward Eygpt. Facts are in short supply as he learns about the king who united upper and lower Eygpt. They are looking for his tomb in the Sud; a very unfriendly place. As they finally find the tomb, the description of what they find and how they set up a tunnel to unseal the tomb is awesome. Their are unholy actions taking place as more bad luck befalls the group. Enjoy this one!
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PACS Ed
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well-developed story .
Reviewed in the United States on September 5, 2020
This was a well-developed story that used archeology and history to support the tale. Anyone who enjoys Egyptology will enjoy the author''s use of both intertwined throughout the narrative to support the progress of the story. The characters fit well into the tale and the... See more
This was a well-developed story that used archeology and history to support the tale. Anyone who enjoys Egyptology will enjoy the author''s use of both intertwined throughout the narrative to support the progress of the story. The characters fit well into the tale and the reader could "see" them in action experiencing the lively movement that accompanies the tale. I highly recommend the author and the book as an easy read that has built-in suspense and anticipation as hooks to keep one hanging on to the last page.
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another Child Classic
Reviewed in the United States on February 9, 2021
I''ve read several of the Child\Preston books and enjoyed them all. When Child goes solo, however, he truly creates magic. The reader is transported - never abandoned - to new worlds of science, history, and the art of fictional writing. I had never heard of the sector of... See more
I''ve read several of the Child\Preston books and enjoyed them all. When Child goes solo, however, he truly creates magic. The reader is transported - never abandoned - to new worlds of science, history, and the art of fictional writing. I had never heard of the sector of Africa known as The Sudd. Now I''ll never forget it. I want to see it. And ancient Egypt is always riveting to me. I highly recommend this book.
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Mae Clair
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Worth Reading!
Reviewed in the United States on February 25, 2014
This was an enjoyable book, although not quite what I expected. An archaeological expedition is attempting to locate the tomb of an ancient Pharaoh in hopes of recovering a fabled crown. In order to accomplish this, a team of experts in varying fields are assembled,... See more
This was an enjoyable book, although not quite what I expected. An archaeological expedition is attempting to locate the tomb of an ancient Pharaoh in hopes of recovering a fabled crown. In order to accomplish this, a team of experts in varying fields are assembled, including the book’s protagonist, Dr. Jeremy Logan, a renowned enigmaoligist (loved his profession).

The search is orchestrated in the middle of a repugnant swampy river of rotting vegetation and muck called The Sudd (which is so brilliantly described by the author, it becomes a character in itself).

I’m a fan of Mr. Child’s coauthored Pendergast novels with Douglas Preston and I’ve loved most of his solo efforts, especially Terminal Freeze which was a scary, riveting read and still an all-time favorite of mine. I was hoping The Third Gate would give me that same creepy, anxious feeling of suspense as Terminal Freeze, but I found a good portion of it to be plodding. The premise is certainly interesting, but it took so long for anything to actually happen, and then when it did, the incidents were a bit of a let-down. I guess I was expecting more of the team dealing with the curse as their numbers were whittled away. The first half of the book is mostly comprised of set-up for the action at the end.

It’s obvious a lot of thought and creativity went into this novel, and the writing reflects that. I wasn’t sold on the ending, but the entire premise is still spinning around in my head a day later, so I guess that’s a good sign.

This was a decent novel, just not the breathless, fast-paced read I was expecting. It’s more focused on science than thrills. The Egyptology thread is riveting and the dots are well-connected, if fantastical. I have no problem suspending belief when I pick up a novel by Mr. Child -- I fully expect to be transported to areas of thought and credence not normally embraced – but prefer the rush of breathless suspense to crossed T’s and dotted I’s.

One of the pitfalls of being such a successful author is fan expectation. We anticipate a home run every time. The Third Gate was more like a triple play for me, but I’m certainly glad I spent the time within its pages. I look forward to the next release from Mr. Child, and consider myself a fan for life!
2 people found this helpful
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R. Turner
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Pretty good
Reviewed in the United States on April 2, 2016
Great sorry but it was kind of slow for awhile there. I have to admit thatched a hard time reading the end part because I have claustrophobia and even reading about places that are underground or I closed like tunnels and the like are hard for me to read so I did read thru... See more
Great sorry but it was kind of slow for awhile there. I have to admit thatched a hard time reading the end part because I have claustrophobia and even reading about places that are underground or I closed like tunnels and the like are hard for me to read so I did read thru the ending a bit faster more like skimming lol it makes me very uncomfortable and nervous. I could revenue read the book " The Sand " because it takes place IN the sand and people kind of swim in it like water but that really bothered me although I haven''t given up on it just yet lol. Anyways it''s good story well written fast paced about halfway thru where it picks up more. I do agree with some other reviewers though this book could have been a lot better. Four stars isn''t bad though.
2 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

S. Foord-Divers
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unputdownable!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 9, 2019
Having read "The forgotten room" I was keen to read another of Lincoln Child''s Dr Jeremy Logan books. This did not disappoint. Intriguing, exciting, an excellent story, unputdownable. If you have an interest in ancient Egypt, this is a good book for you.
Having read "The forgotten room" I was keen to read another of Lincoln Child''s Dr Jeremy Logan books. This did not disappoint. Intriguing, exciting, an excellent story, unputdownable. If you have an interest in ancient Egypt, this is a good book for you.
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F. A. Rodner
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
a good thriller
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 10, 2013
I signed up on the waiting list for this because I am a fan of Lincoln Child''s other solo books and what he has written with Douglas Preston. The Third Gate is a teeny bit disappointing by comparison - a single line plot with weak characterisation and predictable finish....See more
I signed up on the waiting list for this because I am a fan of Lincoln Child''s other solo books and what he has written with Douglas Preston. The Third Gate is a teeny bit disappointing by comparison - a single line plot with weak characterisation and predictable finish. But the situation is original and the action fast-paced and exciting.
I signed up on the waiting list for this because I am a fan of Lincoln Child''s other solo books and what he has written with Douglas Preston. The Third Gate is a teeny bit disappointing by comparison - a single line plot with weak characterisation and predictable finish. But the situation is original and the action fast-paced and exciting.
2 people found this helpful
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Mr Martin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
enjoyable
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 24, 2015
Decently paced but the characters seem under developed. It''s difficult to care about any of them despite a good plot
Decently paced but the characters seem under developed. It''s difficult to care about any of them despite a good plot
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Berlino
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Abnutzungserscheinungen?
Reviewed in Germany on August 24, 2012
Bisher habe ich jedes Buch von Preston/Child und alle Solo Novels ohne zu überlegen gekauft, obwohl ich schon bei den vorigen Büchern festgestellt habe, dass irgendwie etwas die Luft raus ist. Vielleicht liegt es daran, dass die beiden ihre Bücher in recht kurzem Abstand...See more
Bisher habe ich jedes Buch von Preston/Child und alle Solo Novels ohne zu überlegen gekauft, obwohl ich schon bei den vorigen Büchern festgestellt habe, dass irgendwie etwas die Luft raus ist. Vielleicht liegt es daran, dass die beiden ihre Bücher in recht kurzem Abstand herausbringen und sich nicht mehr so viel Zeit für ordentliche Stories nehmen. Dieses Buch unterbietet so ziemlich alles. Die Story an sich könnte dabei so interessant sein: mal wieder eine Schatzsuche, aber an einer unverbrauchten Location. Ein Schuss Mystery und die üblichen Thriller-Elemente. Kein Meisterwerk, aber kurzweilige Urlaubslektüre - mehr verlange ich ja gar nicht. Das, was dabei herausgekommen ist, wirkt eher wie eine Parodie oder ein Lehrstück, wie man keinen guten Roman schreibt. Die Charaktere sind noch holzschnittartiger und unglaubwürdiger als je zuvor, der Plot dümpelt zwischen langweilig und unzumutbar, das Ende ist ein Witz. Bis zur Hälfte des Buches kommt noch nicht mal ansatzweise etwas Spannung auf. Gerade die interessante Location - der Sudd, von dem wahrscheinlich die wenigsten Leser vorher gehört haben - wäre doch eine Steilvorlage, um ein atmosphärisches Buch zu schreiben, aber Fehlanzeige. Die angeblich so teuflische Umgebung wird so gut wie kaum erwähnt. Alles wirkt, wie aus Textbausteinen zusammengesetzt, mit einer Einheitsformel verkocht und dann schnell hingeklatscht. Wenn der nächste Pendergast-Roman auch so wird, dann war es das für mich.
Bisher habe ich jedes Buch von Preston/Child und alle Solo Novels ohne zu überlegen gekauft, obwohl ich schon bei den vorigen Büchern festgestellt habe, dass irgendwie etwas die Luft raus ist. Vielleicht liegt es daran, dass die beiden ihre Bücher in recht kurzem Abstand herausbringen und sich nicht mehr so viel Zeit für ordentliche Stories nehmen.

Dieses Buch unterbietet so ziemlich alles. Die Story an sich könnte dabei so interessant sein: mal wieder eine Schatzsuche, aber an einer unverbrauchten Location. Ein Schuss Mystery und die üblichen Thriller-Elemente. Kein Meisterwerk, aber kurzweilige Urlaubslektüre - mehr verlange ich ja gar nicht. Das, was dabei herausgekommen ist, wirkt eher wie eine Parodie oder ein Lehrstück, wie man keinen guten Roman schreibt. Die Charaktere sind noch holzschnittartiger und unglaubwürdiger als je zuvor, der Plot dümpelt zwischen langweilig und unzumutbar, das Ende ist ein Witz. Bis zur Hälfte des Buches kommt noch nicht mal ansatzweise etwas Spannung auf. Gerade die interessante Location - der Sudd, von dem wahrscheinlich die wenigsten Leser vorher gehört haben - wäre doch eine Steilvorlage, um ein atmosphärisches Buch zu schreiben, aber Fehlanzeige. Die angeblich so teuflische Umgebung wird so gut wie kaum erwähnt.

Alles wirkt, wie aus Textbausteinen zusammengesetzt, mit einer Einheitsformel verkocht und dann schnell hingeklatscht. Wenn der nächste Pendergast-Roman auch so wird, dann war es das für mich.
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Roadrunner
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Eindimensional, aber nicht langweilig
Reviewed in Germany on October 6, 2013
Die Geschichte folgt dem üblichen Muster: Eine wissenschaftliche Herausforderung wird mit hohem technologischem Aufwand angegangen, es treten mysteriöse Probleme in unzugänglicher Umgebung auf, schließlich gibt es eine überraschende Entdeckung und danach wird alles...See more
Die Geschichte folgt dem üblichen Muster: Eine wissenschaftliche Herausforderung wird mit hohem technologischem Aufwand angegangen, es treten mysteriöse Probleme in unzugänglicher Umgebung auf, schließlich gibt es eine überraschende Entdeckung und danach wird alles zerstört. "Deep Storm", "Terminal Freeze" etc. lassen grüßen. Ich stimme zu, daß dies Buch kein Meisterwerk ist, fand es aber dennoch unterhaltend und durchaus spannend. Es dauert etliche Seiten, bis die Geschichte an Fahrt aufnimmt, aber dann muß man einfach weiter lesen - so wie es sein sollte! Was mich erstaunt, ist die vollständige Linearität der Story. Keine verwobenen Handlungsstränge, keine Rückblenden, nichts! In anderen Romanen von Lincoln Child oder auch Preston&Child gab es meist verschiedene Ebenen und Geschichten, die zum Ende hin aufgelöst wurden, zusammen fanden oder als Cliffhanger für den nächsten Roman dienten. Auch wurde Potential verschenke, das in der "Pharaonengeschichte" steckt. Wie schön wäre es beispielsweise gewesen, parallel zur Jetztzeit, Bau und Nutzung der Begräbnisstätte und der "zwei Kronen" aus Sicht beispielsweise des Pharaos oder eines Priesters zu erleben. Aber am Ende bleibt die enttäuschte Frage: War das alles? Der Showdown wirkt auf mich, als sei der Autor froh gewesen, das Buchprojekt vom Tisch zu haben.
Die Geschichte folgt dem üblichen Muster: Eine wissenschaftliche Herausforderung wird mit hohem technologischem Aufwand angegangen, es treten mysteriöse Probleme in unzugänglicher Umgebung auf, schließlich gibt es eine überraschende Entdeckung und danach wird alles zerstört. "Deep Storm", "Terminal Freeze" etc. lassen grüßen.

Ich stimme zu, daß dies Buch kein Meisterwerk ist, fand es aber dennoch unterhaltend und durchaus spannend. Es dauert etliche Seiten, bis die Geschichte an Fahrt aufnimmt, aber dann muß man einfach weiter lesen - so wie es sein sollte!

Was mich erstaunt, ist die vollständige Linearität der Story. Keine verwobenen Handlungsstränge, keine Rückblenden, nichts! In anderen Romanen von Lincoln Child oder auch Preston&Child gab es meist verschiedene Ebenen und Geschichten, die zum Ende hin aufgelöst wurden, zusammen fanden oder als Cliffhanger für den nächsten Roman dienten.

Auch wurde Potential verschenke, das in der "Pharaonengeschichte" steckt. Wie schön wäre es beispielsweise gewesen, parallel zur Jetztzeit, Bau und Nutzung der Begräbnisstätte und der "zwei Kronen" aus Sicht beispielsweise des Pharaos oder eines Priesters zu erleben.

Aber am Ende bleibt die enttäuschte Frage: War das alles? Der Showdown wirkt auf mich, als sei der Autor froh gewesen, das Buchprojekt vom Tisch zu haben.
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