The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

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Product Description

Here, in one volume: Marjane Satrapi''s best-selling, internationally acclaimed graphic memoir.

Persepolis is the story of Satrapi''s unforgettable childhood and coming of age within a large and loving family in Tehran during the Islamic Revolution; of the contradictions between private life and public life in a country plagued by political upheaval; of her high school years in Vienna facing the trials of adolescence far from her family; of her homecoming--both sweet and terrible; and, finally, of her self-imposed exile from her beloved homeland. It is the chronicle of a girlhood and adolescence at once outrageous and familiar, a young life entwined with the history of her country yet filled with the universal trials and joys of growing up.

Edgy, searingly observant, and candid, often heartbreaking but threaded throughout with raw humor and hard-earned wisdom-- Persepolis is a stunning work from one of the most highly regarded, singularly talented graphic artists at work today.

Review

"A memoir of growing up as a girl in revolutionary Iran, Persepolis provides a unique glimpse into a nearly unknown and unreachable way of life... That Satrapi chose to tell her remarkable story as a gorgeous comic book makes it totally unique and indispensable."
-- Time

About the Author

Marjane Satrapi was born in Rasht, Iran. She now lives in Paris, where she is a regular contributor to magazines and newspapers throughout the world, including The New Yorker, and The New York Times. She is the author of Embroideries, Chicken with Plums, and several children''s books. She cowrote and codirected the animated feature film version of Persepolis.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
2,899 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

kaylee
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What can I say that other reviewers have already said?
Reviewed in the United States on June 24, 2018
This book or comic is already pretty popular, and already a highly recommend book so what can I offer that these others haven''t mentioned? I don''t know, I honestly don''t think I can but maybe someone can take away something about what I say. Now there not a lot of books... See more
This book or comic is already pretty popular, and already a highly recommend book so what can I offer that these others haven''t mentioned? I don''t know, I honestly don''t think I can but maybe someone can take away something about what I say. Now there not a lot of books dealing with Iran or the Iranian revolution and if their is I haven''t found them yet. Now this book is about a young girl going through Iran cultural revolution and how people change and how her whole family had to change or adjust to their surroundings. Eventually she goes to Europe or France (if I remember correctly) and having to deal with love, liberals or hippies, and racism and mean nuns. I don''t think story is the first of its kind but that doesn''t mean that it should be undermined. The story has great illustrations and how the author deals with this struggles. In a way you see her loose her innocents through a child''s eyes till adulthood. There are plenty of stories of young woman having to deal with change, and their countries sexist views and using their religion to justify their actions. Even some American states do it, so calling us nothing or better than Iran is hypocritical. If your intrested in Iran, or the story of a young girl having the deal with change or racism, or the struggles of living in a very conservative/ religious country I would highly recommend this book. Thank you for reading my review. Now if your looking for another Iran comic book that deals with serious issues like Persepolis then look no further than Zahra''s paradise.
16 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Touching and Heartful
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2017
A long time ago my high school history teacher put the movie version on in class, much to the dismay on my classmates. A lot of people began complaining about it so my teacher turned it off. I remember being so fascinated by Marjane Satrapi''s story and finally picked... See more
A long time ago my high school history teacher put the movie version on in class, much to the dismay on my classmates. A lot of people began complaining about it so my teacher turned it off. I remember being so fascinated by Marjane Satrapi''s story and finally picked myself up a copy of her book. What a wonderful story. I think what I love most about the book (which is made up of comic strips) is how different the emotions can be and change. One story/comic strip will have you laughing, another furious, and another heartbroken. It was truly inspiring to see how Ms. Satrapi moved about her life and the trials and tribulations that came with it. Loved it and would highly recommend.
18 people found this helpful
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Xander
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A prerequisite for Iranian education in America Marjane Satrapi
Reviewed in the United States on January 11, 2020
I''m not the most worldly individual. I grew up in a small rural community where my parents and grandparents learned to be afraid of the more urban world. I use to think they were completely wrong with their lay low attitudes but as I matured and learned more about the... See more
I''m not the most worldly individual. I grew up in a small rural community where my parents and grandparents learned to be afraid of the more urban world. I use to think they were completely wrong with their lay low attitudes but as I matured and learned more about the world, I became fascinated by the way we operate and how cruelty and ignorance are in an evolving interpretive dance.

This is a great introduction to graphic novels as well as an introduction into Iranian politics. Marjane''s perspective is unique, she a member of an elite society, her family have cultivated views and influential friends with power, and yet their narrative is drastically rearranged. Marjane''s survival skills are in full effect as she travel Europe and discovers what it means to be an Iranian women.
6 people found this helpful
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Gabriel Cohen Henriquez
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
so small..
Reviewed in the United States on August 28, 2020
This is specifically about the paperback edition; I admit it''s my fault not to read in detail the size specifications of the book before buying, but at US$17.75, almost the same price as the separate Pantheon Graphic Hardcover editions, I assumed it would be of a similar... See more
This is specifically about the paperback edition; I admit it''s my fault not to read in detail the size specifications of the book before buying, but at US$17.75, almost the same price as the separate Pantheon Graphic Hardcover editions, I assumed it would be of a similar size or appearance. For my surprise, the book is very small, at 5.08 x 1.02 x 7.8 inches; for such a price, I would have expected at least a similar size to the Hardcover. Again, my mistake. But buyer beware: those building a library, and specially looking for nice looking, big graphic novels, I think a Hardcover version, even if separated in book 1 and book 2, is a much better investment. I learned my lesson to always read the book-size for next time. I''ll try to sell this tiny version and get those instead.
3 people found this helpful
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Patrick F
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An Important Voice that Refuses to be Silenced
Reviewed in the United States on March 30, 2020
When I think of graphic novels, I think of comic books that inevitably are converted into major movie franchises. And, in fact, my copy of The Complete Persepolis bears a proud little badge honoring its conversion into an award winning motion picture. But this is no Marvel... See more
When I think of graphic novels, I think of comic books that inevitably are converted into major movie franchises. And, in fact, my copy of The Complete Persepolis bears a proud little badge honoring its conversion into an award winning motion picture. But this is no Marvel comic. Persepolis is a memoir of a young life in war torn Iran.

Both the writing and the art in this book are simple and inviting. The story traces Marjane’s life from birth to divorce. Along the way she experiences oppressive government and religious regimes, the torture and disappearances of friends and relatives, a life of reprieve and education in Austria and France which come with their own trials, and the elusive goal of knowing and being comfortable with one’s own identity. The author’s honesty and introspection draw the reader warmly into a violent and inhospitable world. When a misplaced veil could lead to beating or execution, life’s other, internal struggles are kept in perspective though not lost entirely. While the autobiography is frank and revealing, it seems to never truly plumb the depths of the author’s emotional life. A bit more introspection would have been welcome in a woman who has overcome much hardship. Still, it feels like an important story to be told from a time and place that silenced women.

B
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Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
High Expectations, was Mildly Underwhelmed
Reviewed in the United States on January 28, 2020
As an avid reader of books, I was truly excited to read Persepolis. The graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi was critically-acclaimed by many and I had many people recommend the novel to me before I was even assigned this in class. Enthused by all the good reviews I purchased... See more
As an avid reader of books, I was truly excited to read Persepolis. The graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi was critically-acclaimed by many and I had many people recommend the novel to me before I was even assigned this in class. Enthused by all the good reviews I purchased the whole book and finished it in approximately 4 days. The complete story of Persepolis follows Marjane in war-torn Iran, her schooling in another country, and eventual return to her home, all while she grows and experiences the trials and tribulations that come with getting older, like boys, friends, the importance of school, morals, loss, and family values. Marjane deals with many conflicts and interacts with many characters, most notable her family, childhood friends, and schoolmates.
I hated the second part of the book. There is no light or more polite way for me to explain how strongly I despise how this book ends. The pacing of the novel in the second portion is sporadic and confusing. The storyline and her relationships with other characters becomes increasingly hard to understand. The first part of the novel had decent pacing and an interesting enough storyline that compelled me to finish it and continue to the second part. Perhaps the author’s point in changing the way the story was told to signify that as she got older, her view on life looked different. However, it read as bland and boring. The point of the novel was to get rid of negative stereotypes regarding Iran and show that Iranians led regular lives like everyone else, but it more so felt like a very dull retelling of her life. The themes seemingly vanished in the second portion of the book and the story felt dragged. I physically had to force myself into reading the last thirty pages because of how utterly bored I was.
Overall, I would recommend purchasing the first part of Persepolis, but buying the second or the complete version like I did feels like a waste of money. Though the ending was supposed to give a sort of almost nostalgic, wistful feeling, I closed the novel feeling annoyed and like I had wasted a lot of my time. The second potion felt poorly written, thought through, and seemingly rushed. Overall, I would not recommend buying the complete version.
3 people found this helpful
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Marilyn Stryker
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Powerful and Beautiful
Reviewed in the United States on May 6, 2020
The book leaves the reader with strong emotions. It''s powerful and so wonderfully done. It stays very true to the real story. It''s not edited to fancify things. Among the entrainment of this story, there is also the additional education you get from it. It really teaches... See more
The book leaves the reader with strong emotions. It''s powerful and so wonderfully done. It stays very true to the real story. It''s not edited to fancify things. Among the entrainment of this story, there is also the additional education you get from it. It really teaches the reader so much about the history of this topic. And it''s coming from such honest eyes that lived this. More than any history book could communicate. It''s wonderful, I highly recommend it. It''s should be required reading for older grades.
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Lisa
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Worthwhile
Reviewed in the United States on August 1, 2013
What does Iran''s Islamic revolution look like through the eyes of a child? How does a child of war assimilate into western culture? Hard questions which have no clear cut answers are addressed in Marjane Satrapi''s graphic memoir, The Complete Persepolis. Originally... See more
What does Iran''s Islamic revolution look like through the eyes of a child? How does a child of war assimilate into western culture? Hard questions which have no clear cut answers are addressed in Marjane Satrapi''s graphic memoir, The Complete Persepolis. Originally published as two works, Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood and Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return, The Complete Persepolis gives readers a chance to experience Satrapi''s moving, challenging, and at time''s disturbing, account in one full memoir detailing her most tumultuous years. The Complete Persepolis displays new cover art that coincides with the major motion picture release of the same name. The Complete Persepolis does not offer a break within the text to show you where the first memoir ends and the second begins. The story easily flows as though it was always published as one work.
While the graphic novel format helps to make the horror and brutality of revolutionary and post revolutionary Iran in the 1980''s and early 1990''s approachable, it does not tone down the emotion or oppression. Satrapi''s anger and the constraints of the society are tangible, giving readers an intimate glimpse of what life would be like if one were stripped of many basic rights. Young readers without knowledge of the politics of the time period or the history of Persia (yes, Iran was referred to as Persia up until 1935!) will be confused by frequent name dropping. Names of people (Che Guevara), political factions (Bolsheviks), and even religions (Zoroastrianism) will either serve to lead young readers on a quest to learn more, or deter them from finishing the novel. Older readers with more polarized views on the subject at hand must be prepared to accept Persepolis for what it is: a memoir. A memoir written by a woman who lived through the accounts detailed within. It would be a shame for Satrapi''s work to be dismissed due to its disregard for what is and was politically correct. On the contrary, Satrapi''s consistent disregard for authority she deems inept and for critics who may find fault in her stance is exactly why this book should be embraced. There is an unabashed authenticity that makes this a refreshing addition to any library''s collection of nonfiction work.
The Complete Persepolis is not without its faults. The sheer volume of characters and settings in the story is confusing at times. The graphic novel format does not help in this matter, for as characters grow and change, it is often impossible to recognize them if not mentioned by name. It is this rushed, graphic novel pace that at once makes a difficult subject approachable, yet leaves the reader longing for a more complete understanding. Some details seem to be skimmed over in places and then later brought to the forefront, leaving the reader to thumb back through to find context. Some characters and relationships, as well, seem to drastically change without enough reason given for the reader to truly feel they have been let in on Satrapi''s complete experience.
It would be more beneficial for libraries to purchase Persepolis as it was originally published in the U.S., in two separate volumes, for the content of the two is appropriate for different audiences. Persepolis: A Childhood would be appropriate high school reading, even as part of the curriculum so long as the teacher is well prepared for many questions, explanations, and lengthy discussions (also probable parent protestations). Persepolis 2: A Return should be saved for only the most mature of high school readers, due to its mature themes and often gritty and controversial subject matter. It would be hard to keep young readers of A Childhood from wanting to continue with Marjane on her journey in A Return, but the sexual content and drug use need to be approached in a very sensitive manner. One of the most disconcerting scenes is when Marjane is staying at her friend Julie''s house and Julie is sharing stories of her sexual escapades: "I''ve already slept with eighteen guys....at first we used condoms, but the guy feels less." It is clear that readers need to be mature and well educated on safe sex practices in order to see that what Julie is recounting as common behavior is actually extremely dangerous.
Mature readers ready for an original experience and an inside look at a very private existence will devour The Complete Persepolis. Readers drawn into Satrapi''s world will be delighted to find she has published two shorter graphic novels, Embroideries (2006) and Chicken with Plums (2009) that will give more insight into the culture of Iran and the workings and emotions of people living within a closed off society.
9 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Elena
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thank you!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 16, 2017
I suppose that of the many praising words written for this book, which deserves them all, very little has been said about the beneficial effect it can have on a reluctant-to-read grumpy teenager. I had personally read it years ago and I cannot praise it enough, a daring...See more
I suppose that of the many praising words written for this book, which deserves them all, very little has been said about the beneficial effect it can have on a reluctant-to-read grumpy teenager. I had personally read it years ago and I cannot praise it enough, a daring genius important novel!!! But i bought it again in my pursue to convince my daughter to read (she had stopped all of a sudden months ago) and it worked wonders. She was totally taken by the very clever story telling and the deeply emotional history scenario. As a young woman she felt connected and touched by the female protagonists and their struggle. She has not stopped reading other books since, similar format or subject. Thank you Mrs. Satrapi for having helped a young lady to reconnect with a reality which is not filtered by utube/instagram/facebook viewers, but much vaster and more profound.
25 people found this helpful
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Luna's Little Library
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you haven’t read any graphic novels before then let this be the one to start.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 14, 2015
This graphic novel memoir is split into sections, the firs tells of Marjane Satrapi’s life in Tehran from when she 6 to 14. It’s her experience of the changes after the overthrowing of the Shah’s regime, the Islamic revolution and the war with Iraq. The second half is about...See more
This graphic novel memoir is split into sections, the firs tells of Marjane Satrapi’s life in Tehran from when she 6 to 14. It’s her experience of the changes after the overthrowing of the Shah’s regime, the Islamic revolution and the war with Iraq. The second half is about Marji’s life in Austria, where her family sent her own safety, her isolation there and then Marji’s return to Tehran after four years. Marjane Satrapi’s narration is engaging, you get to know her and her life really well. I learned so much from Persepolis. During the first half of the book (when Marji is a child) there are explanations about what was going on in Tehran at that time, as well the history behind this. When Marji returns from Austria the public vs private life personas continue to be opposite. People are being watched all the time. I think the below quote from Persepolis is fitting: The regime had understood that one person leaving her house while asking herself: Are my trousers long enough?’ Is my veil in place?’ Can my make-up be seen?’ Are they going to whip me?’ No longer asks herself: Where is my freedom of thought?’ Where is my freedom of speech?’ My life, is it livable?’ What’s going on in the political prisons?” If you haven’t read any graphic novels before then let this be the one to start. Don’t like history or memoirs? I think Persepolis might just convince you otherwise.
10 people found this helpful
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Djilly L.Top Contributor: Harry Potter
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Heartbreaking and thought-provoking
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 10, 2021
Great narrative about an Iranian girl through the turbulent years of the Islamic revolution from the mid-1970’s and the war with Iraq. I must say I loved it. However I initially bought it for our literature-devoted daughter who collects books and more recently has developed...See more
Great narrative about an Iranian girl through the turbulent years of the Islamic revolution from the mid-1970’s and the war with Iraq. I must say I loved it. However I initially bought it for our literature-devoted daughter who collects books and more recently has developed an interest in graphic novels of which she is building a small precious library as well. The challenge with her new interest is that there are not that that many graphic novels for people of her age that are of high quality and that are engaging. I thought Persepolis was an interesting modern history topic about social events that would open up a new world to her about. However she seemed quite dismissive about the book given that it lay around, untouched for months. Turned out she didn’t think much of the scribbly, childish style of art in black and white, printed on cheap paper. Which I can understand. I then started to read it to her, providing explanation, giving additional background information and answering her questions. This turned out to be really good fun and lead to valuable little debates. The book is somewhat witty and funny, but the narrative is very impressive and bound to leave an impression. The whole presentation can’t match some of the other hard-cover super beautifully illustrated graphic novels we have, but it certainly stands out as a story.
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Nick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book for my first graphic novel!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 8, 2020
An absolutely fantastic book. I decided to read this after travelling to Iran last year, and also when it was recommended by the Guardian as one of the best books of the 21st century so far. I’d never read a graphic novel before, but Persepolis kept me hooked from the start...See more
An absolutely fantastic book. I decided to read this after travelling to Iran last year, and also when it was recommended by the Guardian as one of the best books of the 21st century so far. I’d never read a graphic novel before, but Persepolis kept me hooked from the start and told a remarkably human story - would highly recommend a read by anyone who’s interested in Iran, it’s culture, history or the Islamic Revolution. You won’t be disappointed.
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Mr TM Roderick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing book - everyone should read it!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 4, 2018
Lovely graphic novel about Iran during the time of Western Liberalisation in society and how this affected life for young, liberal minded Iranians in terms of how the Imans and more hardline Islamic community tried to suppress it. (I have absolute respect for Muslims /...See more
Lovely graphic novel about Iran during the time of Western Liberalisation in society and how this affected life for young, liberal minded Iranians in terms of how the Imans and more hardline Islamic community tried to suppress it. (I have absolute respect for Muslims / Islamic faith btw!!) - not trolling that at all. This is a very eloquently told and illustrated account of what I would imagine a lot of young Iranians must have experienced, and, I imagine, a lot of young Muslims, particularly those living in Western capitalist countries must equally feel today in terms of their own personal and cultural identities.
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The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online

The discount Complete lowest Persepolis online