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Description

Product Description

Book one in the blockbuster Maze Runner series that spawned a movie franchise and ushered in a worldwide phenomenon! And don’t miss The Fever Code, the highly-anticipated series conclusion that finally reveals the story of how the maze was built!
 
   When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his name. He’s surrounded by strangers—boys whose memories are also gone.
   Outside the towering stone walls that surround them is a limitless, ever-changing maze. It’s the only way out—and no one’s ever made it through alive.
   Then a girl arrives. The first girl ever. And the message she delivers is terrifying: Remember. Survive. Run.

The Maze Runner and Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials, and Maze Runner: The Death Cure all are now major motion pictures featuring the star of MTV''s  Teen Wolf, Dylan O’Brien; Kaya Scodelario; Aml Ameen; Will Poulter; and Thomas Brodie-Sangster.
 
Also look for James Dashner’s edge-of-your-seat MORTALITY DOCTRINE series!

Praise for the Maze Runner series:

A #1 New York Times Bestselling Series
USA Today Bestseller
Kirkus Reviews Best Teen Book of the Year
An ALA-YASLA Best Fiction for Young Adults Book
An ALA-YALSA Quick Pick
 
“[A] mysterious survival saga that passionate fans describe as  a fusion of Lord of the FliesThe Hunger Games, and Lost.” — EW
 
“Wonderful action writing —fast-paced…but smart and well observed.” Newsday
 
“[A]  nail-biting must-read.” Seventeen
 
“Breathless,  cinematic action.” — Publishers Weekly
 
Heart pounding to the very last moment.” — Kirkus Reviews
 
Exclamation-worthy.” — Romantic Times
 
“James Dashner’s illuminating prequel [ The Kill Order] will thrill fans of this Maze Runner [series] and prove just as  exciting for readers new to the series.” — Shelf Awareness, Starred

Take a deep breath before you start any James Dashner book.” — Deseret News

Review

Praise for the Maze Runner series:
A #1 New York Times Bestselling Series
A USA Today Bestseller
A Kirkus Reviews Best Teen Book of the Year
An ALA-YASLA Best Fiction for Young Adults Book
An ALA-YALSA Quick Pick
 
"[A] mysterious survival saga that passionate fans describe as a fusion of Lord of the Flies, The Hunger Games, and Lost."— EW
 
“Wonderful action writing —fast-paced…but smart and well observed.” Newsday
 
“[A] nail-biting must-read.” Seventeen
 
“Breathless, cinematic action.”— Publishers Weekly
 
Heart pounding to the very last moment.”— Kirkus Reviews
 
Exclamation-worthy.”— Romantic Times
 
[ STAR] “James Dashner’s illuminating prequel [ The Kill Order] will thrill fans of this Maze Runner [series] and prove just as exciting for readers new to the series.”— Shelf Awareness, Starred

" Take a deep breath before you start any James Dashner book."- Deseret News

About the Author

James Dashner is the author of the #1 New York Times bestselling Maze Runner series: The Maze Runner, The Scorch Trials, The Death Cure, and The Kill Order, as well as The Eye of Minds and The Rule of Thoughts, the first two books in the Mortality Doctrine series. Dashner was born and raised in Georgia, but now lives and writes in the Rocky Mountains. To learn more about James and his books, visit JamesDashner.com, follow @jamesdashner on Twitter, and find dashnerjames on Instagram.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1


He began his new life standing up, surrounded by cold darkness and stale, dusty air.
Metal ground against metal; a lurching shudder shook the floor beneath him. He fell down at the sudden movement and shuffled backward on his hands and feet, drops of sweat beading on his forehead despite the cool air. His back struck a hard metal wall; he slid along it until he hit the corner of the room. Sinking to the floor, he pulled his legs up tight against his body, hoping his eyes would soon adjust to the darkness.

With another jolt, the room jerked upward like an old lift in a mine shaft.

Harsh sounds of chains and pulleys, like the workings of an ancient steel factory, echoed through the room, bouncing off the walls with a hollow, tinny whine. The lightless elevator swayed back and forth as it ascended, turning the boy''s stomach sour with nausea; a smell like burnt oil invaded his senses, making him feel worse. He wanted to cry, but no tears came; he could only sit there, alone, waiting.

My name is Thomas, he thought.

That... that was the only thing he could remember about his life.

He didn''t understand how this could be possible. His mind functioned without flaw, trying to calculate his surroundings and predicament. Knowledge flooded his thoughts, facts and images, memories and details of the world and how it works. He pictured snow on trees, running down a leaf-strewn road, eating a hamburger, the moon casting a pale glow on a grassy meadow, swimming in a lake, a busy city square with hundreds of people bustling about their business.

And yet he didn''t know where he came from, or how he''d gotten inside the dark lift, or who his parents were. He didn''t even know his last name. Images of people flashed across his mind, but there was no recognition, their faces replaced with haunted smears of color. He couldn''t think of one person he knew, or recall a single conversation.

The room continued its ascent, swaying; Thomas grew immune to the ceaseless rattling of the chains that pulled him upward. A long time passed. Minutes stretched into hours, although it was impossible to know for sure because every second seemed an eternity. No. He was smarter than that. Trusting his instincts, he knew he''d been moving for roughly half an hour.

Strangely enough, he felt his fear whisked away like a swarm of gnats caught in the wind, replaced by an intense curiosity. He wanted to know where he was and what was happening.

With a groan and then a clonk, the rising room halted; the sudden change jolted Thomas from his huddled position and threw him across the hard floor. As he scrambled to his feet, he felt the room sway less and less until it finally stilled. Everything fell silent.

A minute passed. Two. He looked in every direction but saw only darkness; he felt along the walls again, searching for a way out. But there was nothing, only the cool metal. He groaned in frustration; his echo amplified through the air, like the haunted moan of death. It faded, and silence returned. He screamed, called for help, pounded on the walls with his fists.

Nothing.

Thomas backed into the corner once again, folded his arms and shivered, and the fear returned. He felt a worrying shudder in his chest, as if his heart wanted to escape, to flee his body.

"Someone... help... me!" he screamed; each word ripped his throat raw.

A loud clank rang out above him and he sucked in a startled breath as he looked up. A straight line of light appeared across the ceiling of the room, and Thomas watched as it expanded. A heavy grating sound revealed double sliding doors being forced open. After so long in darkness, the light stabbed his eyes; he looked away, covering his face with both hands.

He heard noises above--voices--and fear squeezed his chest.

"Look at that shank."

"How old is he?"

"Looks like a klunk in a T-shirt."

"You''re the klunk, shuck-face."

"Dude, it smells like feet down there!"

"Hope you enjoyed the one-way trip, Greenie."

"Ain''t no ticket back, bro."

Thomas was hit with a wave of confusion, blistered with panic. The voices were odd, tinged with echo; some of the words were completely foreign--others felt familiar. He willed his eyes to adjust as he squinted toward the light and those speaking. At first he could see only shifting shadows, but they soon turned into the shapes of bodies--people bending over the hole in the ceiling, looking down at him, pointing.

And then, as if the lens of a camera had sharpened its focus, the faces cleared. They were boys, all of them--some young, some older. Thomas didn''t know what he''d expected, but seeing those faces puzzled him. They were just teenagers. Kids. Some of his fear melted away, but not enough to calm his racing heart.

Someone lowered a rope from above, the end of it tied into a big loop. Thomas hesitated, then stepped into it with his right foot and clutched the rope as he was yanked toward the sky. Hands reached down, lots of hands, grabbing him by his clothes, pulling him up. The world seemed to spin, a swirling mist of faces and color and light. A storm of emotions wrenched his gut, twisted and pulled; he wanted to scream, cry, throw up. The chorus of voices had grown silent, but someone spoke as they yanked him over the sharp edge of the dark box. And Thomas knew he''d never forget the words.

"Nice to meet ya, shank," the boy said. "Welcome to the Glade."

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
13,916 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

William E Kaufman
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Do NOT let a child read this.
Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2019
This is a horror book filled with nastiness, lack of empathy, and most revoltingly, the idea that it''s reasonable and morally correct to torture and kill children in the name of possibly saving the human race. I forced myself to finish it to see if the ending had any... See more
This is a horror book filled with nastiness, lack of empathy, and most revoltingly, the idea that it''s reasonable and morally correct to torture and kill children in the name of possibly saving the human race. I forced myself to finish it to see if the ending had any redeeming qualities---it does not. A "teaser" for the second book begins with a brother and sister kidnapped after watching the murder of their parents. Apparently many adults, including respected reviewers, can maintain enough emotional distance to enjoy this sort of thing, but I am not one of them. And I certainly do not regard this as appropriate for children, or even teenagers.
177 people found this helpful
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SheR
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I think....
Reviewed in the United States on June 6, 2017
I got this book shortly after having watched the first film. The movie really drew me in and I had to have it. Now, altogether, I think I like the film much better than the book, but the novel has its merits too without a doubt. I see a lot of reviews talking... See more
I got this book shortly after having watched the first film. The movie really drew me in and I had to have it. Now, altogether, I think I like the film much better than the book, but the novel has its merits too without a doubt.

I see a lot of reviews talking about how the characters were without personality, boring, unreadable, flat. In some ways I do understand the frustration. At times it''s near impossible to read what is going on exactly, BUT I think I''ve found purpose to what so many deem madness. I mean, these are kids who woke up in a strange place with no memory of who they are, where they came from. To top it all off, they''re trapped in a maze crawling with monsters at night. And no matter how much they try to escape, they can''t. They have lived in a place with no idea of what they were, who they were supposed to be, or what they ARE supposed to be now. For me, it would only make sense for a stagnant environment to produce stagnation in the people occupying it. I know that may be reaching a little bit - but it''s what has helped me to manage through the book with a peaked interest.

I couldn''t put the novel down. Overall, I find the concept of the story good. And despite the blank slates of many characters, they are still fairly likable (except for Alby. Book Alby worked my absolute last nerve. He was a complete 360 from his movie self and I have never hated a character so much so quickly. I disliked him more than Gally >:( ). All in all, the movie made me want to dive directly into The Scorch Trials, so it definitely did something right. Honestly, I think the biggest issue that most people can agree with is the lack of personality in the characters. But in my perspective, I can kind of make it work in my head! I look forward to continuing these books.
46 people found this helpful
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B&C Arroyo
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An okay plot line, but the characters were forgettable
Reviewed in the United States on August 13, 2015
The Maze Runner? (Rolls eyes so hard she can see her brain) Meh, it was forgettable...and aggravating! In fact, I can distinctly remember the day-to-day struggle I had with the book! Days where I would dread the fact that I had to pick up The Maze Runner and suffer reading... See more
The Maze Runner? (Rolls eyes so hard she can see her brain) Meh, it was forgettable...and aggravating! In fact, I can distinctly remember the day-to-day struggle I had with the book! Days where I would dread the fact that I had to pick up The Maze Runner and suffer reading through the endless chapters that give you no answers, no purpose to The Maze, no clear objective, annoying and pointless characters that you feel no connection to, and hopelessness.

Hmm, okay, have you ever played Monkey in the Middle? Well, imagine you are the monkey in the middle, you have Thomas (the lead character) on one end, and James Dashner (the author) on the other end. Okay, now imagine James Dashner holding a mysterious black velvet drawstring which holds all the answers you are dying to get your hands on. Okay, now picture Thomas and Dashner cackling as they toss the drawstring back and forth over your head. At first, you chuckle and say something like, "Oh, come on guys," then 30 chapters later, while they continue to play their silly game, you give up on the attempt to intercept the drawstring, and crossing your arms you say something like, "Okay, this is getting really annoying."

Finally, after 60 chapters, you decide to walk up to Dashner and rashly kick him right on the chin and you shout, "ENOUGH!" And in your disgraceful moment of defeat and frustration, Dashner "thoughtfully" hands over the black velvet drawstring, so as to say, "All right, I''m sorry." You gasp, and then squeal, AT LAST! YOU HAVE THE ANSWERS! You fall to your knees and madly begin to open up the black velvet drawstring, "This is it! This is it!" you exclaim to yourself, only to uncover....complete and utter darkness; yep, nothing. The bag was empty the entire time.

Then, as your gaze moves steadily up at Dashner, you take notice that he is frowning, and smiling, and laughing all while staring at Thomas, who is responding in the same manner. And then it hits you, they are able to converse telepathically! What in the world!? Argh!

So you get up, take a deep breath, sweep whatever Dashner dust-bunnies have settled onto your jeans and shoulders, and begin to walk away from their wicked scheme; who needs those guys anyway? Rude! But just as you are storming off, Dashner runs up to you, laughing irritatingly while trying to catch his breath and says, "Okay, okay," his arms up in surrender, "I''m done, here take this, you''ll want to read this," and just like that, he walks over to Thomas (who is laughing hysterically by the way), they pat themselves on the back, as to congratulate each other, and they walk away.

You shake your head in utter confusion and look down at the single sheet of paper resting on the palm of your hand, you unfold it, it''s an epilogue. The best darn thing Dashner wrote in the entire book!
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Kelly Brigid
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lord of the Flies Meets Hunger Games
Reviewed in the United States on September 29, 2018
It truly does upset me to face the reality of how I feel about this book now, but I need to say it. I don’t like The Maze Runner nearly as much as I used to. There, it’s out! In all fairness, this was only the second young-adult dystopian novel I had read at the time (the... See more
It truly does upset me to face the reality of how I feel about this book now, but I need to say it. I don’t like The Maze Runner nearly as much as I used to. There, it’s out! In all fairness, this was only the second young-adult dystopian novel I had read at the time (the first being The Hunger Games). I was young. I was naive. Back then I wouldn’t dwell on the author’s writing style or his character development. I didn’t care about, much less notice, plot holes and amateur writing. It truly amazes me that I didn’t realize how two-dimensional Thomas was or how the writing was barely tolerable the first time I read it. I know I’m making this seem as though I hate it now, but I still like the book. It’s original, suspenseful, and has several likable characters.

~The Plot~

I always liked the concept of Lord of the Flies, which the author states was his inspiration for The Maze Runner, but it overall left me unsatisfied. The premise for The Maze Runner however, is incredibly intriguing: a group of teenage boys without any memories, trapped in a maze. At first I thought it sounded interesting enough, but something was stopping me from reading it right away. I guess I assumed it was too out of the ordinary to begin reading right away. I’m pretty sure my initial thought of the Maze Runner before reading the synopsis was something like this.

The reader has no idea what’s happening from the start, and I will tell you straight out that it gets frustrating. Not a single soul will answer any of Thomas’ questions. Hey, I just got stranded here with the rest of you, and I’d like to know WHY! But, as annoying as that is, it’s also one of my favorite aspects of the book. I needed to know what on earth was going on just as much as Thomas, and I wasn’t putting the book down until I found out, though it did drag on a little too long, if you ask me. Also, I imagine it’d be pretty funny if I was a teenage guy and don’t remember seeing a girl until Teresa showed up…

~The Characters~

According to psychological studies, the average person prefers to have bad news before good news. Hmph, very well. Let’s start with our oh so special snowflake. When I first read Maze Runner I thought he was okay, now however…I’m not going to sugarcoat it. Thomas is one of the most underdeveloped two-dimensional protagonists ever. What Dashner fails to realize is that there is a fine line between bravery and stupidity. Nearly every heroic, self-sacrificing act Thomas commits in the book is just plain stupid, unrealistic, and frankly, suicidal.

I’ve always hated Teresa. She serves no purpose to the plot whatsoever, except to be Thomas’ insta-love interest. Why??? Why does there always need to be a love interest in every one of these teen dystopian novels! If she was actually a useful character I wouldn’t have minded her as much, but she isn’t. Character development? I don’t recall any. Zero. Zip. Nada. She has personality…but it is that of an absolute shuck-face. I love to have a kick-butt female heroine, but she’s just a down-right jerk. “Ah, my Knight in Shining Armor. What, you don’t think I can fend for myself?” Who the heck does she think she is?

Chuck was awesome! If you ask me, Thomas didn’t give Chuck the time of day (another reason to hate him), but every time Chuck made an appearance I would quite complaining and listen up. It’s not necessarily that Chuck was the funniest character ever, but he’s just so darn, likable. Oh, and the actor who portrays him in the movie is perfect. Just thought I’d point that out.

Oh, Minho. What can I say? I love him! Sarcastic, snarky guys are my favorite! His remarks were the best. I actually liked it when Minho made that less than noble decision in the Maze. That was realistic! I don’t entirely agree with him, but it proved he isn’t a perfect little angel (like a certain other person…named Thomas) Also, thank you James Dashner, for not naming him Kai. Is it just me, or why does it seem like every Asian guy is named Kai or Ky?!

Newt was pretty amazing too. He was the voice of reason in this book, whenever Thomas suggested something, well…as Newt would say, bloody stupid, he’s the one who slapped some sense into him. I think I liked Minho slightly more than Newt, but I liked them both, quite a bit.

As for the other characters, I wish they were developed more, but they were all so boring that I couldn’t care less. Gally was interesting, but wasn’t in the book that much – a shame really, because it would’ve made the last part of the book all the more emotional.

~The Writing~

I didn’t really pay attention to writing until I actually tried to write a book last year. In doing so, I realized that it’s surprisingly pretty hard to write a full-length novel. I have the beginning and the end, now what do I fill in-between…The number one rule of writing is to show don’t tell. Dashner just tells the reader what’s happening and how Thomas is feeling. I know this probably didn’t bug that many people, but it’s just a huge pet peeve of mine. However, I do like the slang. It was amusing.

~Final Thoughts~

I think what really infuriates me about this book, is that it had so much potential. If a different author wrote this, I think it could’ve been outstanding. I really liked the concept, a few of the characters, and the setting, but it’s overall a very mediocre read. Despite it’s flaws, The Maze Runner was still a fun read that I’d recommend to newer fans of YA dystopias.
12 people found this helpful
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Kurt Guntheroth
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Attention-holding kid fiction
Reviewed in the United States on January 22, 2019
In the Maze Runner, a bunch of teenage boys are trapped in an artificial environment. Their memories are wiped so they have little basis for comparison, but they know their environment is not natural. They yearn to "get out". That''s pretty much the whole story, but The Maze... See more
In the Maze Runner, a bunch of teenage boys are trapped in an artificial environment. Their memories are wiped so they have little basis for comparison, but they know their environment is not natural. They yearn to "get out". That''s pretty much the whole story, but The Maze Runner makes it interesting. Why are they there? How do they get out? What do they do with their lives in the meantime? There are lots of little adventures, mostly leading to a frustrating failure to answer the basic questions...until the end, yay.

There are four books in this series. I know some series tend to "jump the shark" after the first book (I''m talking to you, 100 Cupboards, and you, Golden Compass). This series, though becoming slightly formulaic (another adventure, another betrayal, another lie) holds up pretty well, compared for instance to the Rick Riorden Olympus books.
8 people found this helpful
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Sarah Ochocki
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Maze Bummer: A Review with Evidence
Reviewed in the United States on June 2, 2015
I could sit here and tell you all the reasons why the writing in James Dashner’s book is atrocious. I could tell you the main character possesses zero personality traits other than relentless naiveté. I could tell you the plot is at times exhaustively rushed, at other times... See more
I could sit here and tell you all the reasons why the writing in James Dashner’s book is atrocious. I could tell you the main character possesses zero personality traits other than relentless naiveté. I could tell you the plot is at times exhaustively rushed, at other times glacial. I could tell you the dialogue is juvenile and awkward. But I, unlike Mr. Dashner, understand the importance of showing rather than telling. And so I hereby present a small sampling of the most egregious literary disappointments that Dashner has inflicted upon young readers with this abomination of a book.

-“It reminded Thomas of a haunted house from a movie or something.” The level of detail here is just astounding. It''s like I was THERE.

-“He felt like he’d shrunk to the size of a small rat.” Thank God you specified that the rat was small. Otherwise I’d never have understood the simile.

-“’It wasn’t me, I swear,’ he said.” An airtight argument that Atticus Finch himself couldn’t have deflated.

-“He was definitely uncomfortable but not nearly as scared as a few moments earlier.” Ahhh, pleasantly convoluted language choice, Mr. Dashner! I detect a soupçon of vagueness and a woody hint of verbosity.

-“He wanted to cry, but he didn’t.” I’m getting a real sense of inner turmoil here.

-“He loved the kid. He loved him as if they had the same mom.” Like they had the same mom, huh? If only there were, I don’t know, some sort of WORD to describe the condition of two human beings with the same mother…. It’s on the tip of my tongue…

-“He was surprised at how much he truly hated the guy.” How much, Mr. Dashner? I need to know how much he hated him! “He really, really hated him.” Ah. Well that settles that, then.
35 people found this helpful
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CRboy
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
You probably will not enjoy this book...
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2020
The Maze Runner, by James Dashner was at best a decent book to read. This science fiction novel, the first in its five book series, is about a repeated and unoriginal concept - teens vs the government. The book starts out with a boy named Thomes who wakes up... See more
The Maze Runner, by James Dashner was at best a decent book to read. This science fiction novel, the first in its five book series, is about a repeated and unoriginal concept - teens vs the government.

The book starts out with a boy named Thomes who wakes up being taken up a dark elevator. When the doors open from above, he is greeted by other teenagers, all boys, in a small patch of land surrounded by large walls. Confused and scared, Thomas can not remember anything about himself... except for his name. All of the people inside the “glade” as they call it have no idea why they were put into this situation or how to get out. Thomas soon finds out the large walls surrounding the glade is actually a maze which changes everyday. Throughout the book the teenagers try to find a way out of the maze.

As I read the book I was looking for answers the whole time. It was confusing enough, but without getting an explanation to why this occurred, made me keep reading. I was not enjoying the book, but wanted to get to the end just to finish it and understand the book better. SPOILER WARNING…. When Thomas and the rest make it out of the maze, answers are still not provided, which makes me all together dislike this book. The ending is supposed to feel like a cliffhanger to the next book, but I was just glad it was over. I will not be reading the second book.

After reading the book, I watched the movie, which was honestly better to me. The movie had much more character development and a better explanation and ending to the book.

Since this book has a very repeated concept of kids vs a higher force, I would not recommend this read to anyone. The book was unoriginal and the ending was not satisfying. It was much more enjoyable getting through the movie, which I would recommend to watch if you want to finish the series. I am giving the book a 2 out of 5, because I at least was able to finish the book, but not enjoy it.
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TeresaTop Contributor: Fantasy Books
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing
Reviewed in the United States on April 4, 2015
So recently I decided I wanted to try out audiobooks for my commute to and from work, and The Maze Runner was the first audiobook I decided to try. I had been meaning to get to this series for a while now and I figured this was the perfect excuse. I am so glad I finally got... See more
So recently I decided I wanted to try out audiobooks for my commute to and from work, and The Maze Runner was the first audiobook I decided to try. I had been meaning to get to this series for a while now and I figured this was the perfect excuse. I am so glad I finally got to this book because it was sooooo good! I loved it and I was addicted and I found myself listening at every single chance I could.

I am seriously kicking myself for waiting so long to get to this book. Beginning to end, this book just grabs you. It has been so long since I have read a dystopian that I really enjoyed but The Maze Runner changed that. The world is dangerous and crazy and kinda scary. The characters are both realistic and likable and the way they interact is so relatable and real. I loved the dynamics of the group and the dialogue.

Our main character Thomas is great and I really enjoyed his perspective. I love the way he took charge of every situation he found himself in and refused to give up. He asked questions and analyzed everything. He was brave and he fought but at the same time he was scared. He wasn’t just this fearless kid who was thrown into a crazy situation and then all of a sudden because awesome. No, he was awesome in spite of being afraid and lost and really having no clue what to do. That is what makes Thomas special.

I also loved the secondary characters: Newt, Teresa, Chuck, and Minho. I have a real soft spot for Teresa, mostly because she has an awesome name, but also because she seems like such a strong character and I feel like I am really going to love her as the story progresses. Chuck I loved even if he could be a bit annoying. And then I really like Newt and Minho and how they kept the other Gladers strong.

I really loved how this story was pulled apart piece by piece. That as a reader you don’t have any more information other than what Thomas has. Discovering everything and watching all the pieces come together was a great ride for the reader.

Now while I don’t have much comparison for it, I really enjoyed the narrator for The Maze Runner. I was able to distinguish between characters well and I never felt myself fall into a lull as he was reading.

All in all, I am really glad I finally made time for The Maze Runner. This is an awesome book and I cannot wait to get to The Scorch Trials.
18 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

hibbzie.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Maze Runner by James Dashner (as always no spoilers)
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 27, 2020
This was the first book by James Dashner that i have read and it will not be the last. Thomas Wakes up in an elevator with no memory other than his name, when the elevator doors finally open he finds himself among many other teenagers in a vast glade. The glade is at the...See more
This was the first book by James Dashner that i have read and it will not be the last. Thomas Wakes up in an elevator with no memory other than his name, when the elevator doors finally open he finds himself among many other teenagers in a vast glade. The glade is at the centre of a massive maze hundreds of feet high and made of stone, the other teens (known as gladers) have been trying to escape through the maze for two years without ANY success, for inside the maze are horrors that i won''t describe here. You will have to read this excellent book to understand what i mean. This novel is supposed to be for teenage readers, i am 52 years old and i really enjoyed it. I give it a very well deserved 5 stars.
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Beatrice Joy
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
OK, but could have been done much better.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 18, 2020
I saw the movie first and then read the three books in the series. Although I sort of enjoyed the books, they are quite different from the movie and the movie is way, way better. The idea is great, but poorly worked out: characters are shallow and do not seem to have...See more
I saw the movie first and then read the three books in the series. Although I sort of enjoyed the books, they are quite different from the movie and the movie is way, way better. The idea is great, but poorly worked out: characters are shallow and do not seem to have logical conversations. They talk endlessly when things are on the verge of bursting. They react illogically given the dire situations at hand; not natural. Also quite a lot of repetition with all the beasties that appear from everywhere and one beastie simply being a variation on the previous beastie. Language constructs are poor and very simple. The author did unfortunately not exploit a great theme and I therefore gave it only a three star rating.
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vivette
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Enjoyable thriller.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 4, 2018
This story was captivating and held my interest throughout. Compared to other teenage dystopian novels, this is in my top ten. It would especially appeal to young adults who enjoy stories with peril, murder and mystery with a measure of science fiction. I, however was...See more
This story was captivating and held my interest throughout. Compared to other teenage dystopian novels, this is in my top ten. It would especially appeal to young adults who enjoy stories with peril, murder and mystery with a measure of science fiction. I, however was touched by the element of humanity that ran through the story. Highly recommended.
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kuzhali
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Woah! One of the best series i''ve ever read
Reviewed in India on August 16, 2018
This series is amazing. especially the first and last book. Many people get the order of the series wrong . The series order in google is wrong. Spoiler Warning: The first three books are flashbacks and the last two books is how the story begins. Please read in this order:...See more
This series is amazing. especially the first and last book. Many people get the order of the series wrong . The series order in google is wrong. Spoiler Warning: The first three books are flashbacks and the last two books is how the story begins. Please read in this order: 1. maze runner , 2. scorch trials , 3. death cure , 4. kill order , 5. fever code U might find the the 3rd and 4th a little bit boring but continue to read to start the best book of the series ,the last one
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D Calvert
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A confusing but enjoyable start to the series
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 27, 2014
Read the full review at: http://polkadotbookblog.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-maze-runner.html When I started this book, I was extremely excited because I had heard good things about it and was told that if I was a fan of the hunger games then this book would be right up my...See more
Read the full review at: http://polkadotbookblog.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-maze-runner.html When I started this book, I was extremely excited because I had heard good things about it and was told that if I was a fan of the hunger games then this book would be right up my street. I was imagining it to be an amazing dystopian book that would have me gripped from page one. But after the first 100 pages I realised that I had too high expectations and unfortunately it was not looking up to it. Which is why this book has me so conflicted on what to rate it because at some points I love it and at others I don''t. Yet there are still many things that I did like about this book. I liked the mystery and the concept that surrounds the series. But then I didn''t like how drawn out it was in the first part. I felt that there wasn''t any important action happening until the middle-end of the book, so I was constantly urging myself to keep at it. The second half of the book is when I started to really enjoy it. I started to get the gripped feeling, where you cannot put the book down because you just had to know what happens. The pace became fast moving and the mystery and action started to get bigger and better, which was not seen in the first part. I just loved the twist at the end. I did not expect it and it is all this that making me what to continue on with the series. Another thing I did like was some of the characters, not all of them but some. Some characters I absolutely adored (Chuck and Newt) but others I was just so uninterested in. I just felt that I had no clue as to what was happening so I couldn''t connect with the characters like I wanted to. Yet I loved the subtle loyalty and friendship Newt offered and the vulnerability of Chuck, that just made me what to kiss them and cheer at the little things they did. Overall, as a book there were so many things that had me going back and forth on whether I loved it or hated it. I loved the plot, the pacing of the second half of the book and some of the characters. But then I hated the pacing at the beginning of the book and was completely confused as to what was going on due to the writing style and confusion the characters themselves were going through. This is ultimately why the rating is 3.5, because what I loved about the book happened in the second half. While at the beginning I was constantly urging myself to just stick with it and not give up, at the end I just couldn''t put it down and was thoroughly gripped.
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