The wholesale Fifth 2021 Child outlet sale

The wholesale Fifth 2021 Child outlet sale

The wholesale Fifth 2021 Child outlet sale
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Noticeable wear on the cover & pages but perfectly readable. Includes dustjacket, if applicable. May have notes &/or highlighting, but the text is readable and not obstructed. May be former library book. May have mild water damage or staining. Does not come with CD/DVD, if applicable. Access code has been used, if applicable. Does not come with any supplementary materials.
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Sold by Vivé Liber Books LLC and fulfilled by Amazon.
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Doris Lessing''s contemporary gothic horror story—centered on the birth of a baby who seems less than human—probes society''s unwillingness to recognize its own brutality.Harriet and David Lovatt, parents of four children, have created an idyll of domestic bliss in defiance of the social trends of late 1960s England. While around them crime and unrest surge, the Lovatts are certain that their old-fashioned contentment can protect them from the world outside—until the birth of their fifth baby. Gruesomely goblin-like in appearance, insatiably hungry, abnormally strong and violent, Ben has nothing innocent or infant-like about him. As he grows older and more terrifying, Harriet finds she cannot love him, David cannot bring himself to touch him, and their four older children are afraid of him. Understanding that he will never be accepted anywhere, Harriet and David are torn between their instincts as parents and their shocked reaction to this fierce and unlovable child whose existence shatters their belief in a benign world.

Amazon.com Review

The married couple in this novel pull off a remarkable achievement: They purchase a three-story house with oodles of bedrooms, and, on a middle-class income, in the ''70s, fill it to the brim with happy children and visiting relatives. Their holiday gatherings are sumptuous celebrations of life and togetherness. And then the fifth child arrives. He''s just a child--he''s not supernatural. But is he really human? This is an elegantly written tale that the New York Times called "a horror story of maternity and the nightmare of social collapse . . . a moral fable of the genre that includes Mary Shelley''s and George Orwell''s ."

From Publishers Weekly

A smug, conservative couple''s fifth child (after four model children) inspires fear and horror. "The implications of this slim, gripping work are ominous," wrote PW. Lessing indicts those in authority who refuse to acknowledge responsibility for the violence inherent in mankind.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

“A hair-raising tale…as full of twists and shocks as any page turner could desire.” — Time“Terse and chilling…. A witch’s brew of conflicting fears.” — The New York Review of Books“A horror story of maternity and the nightmare of social collapse…. A moral fable of the genre that includes Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four.” — The New York Times Book Review

From the Inside Flap

fied couple intent on raising a happy family is shocked by the birth of an abnormal and brutal fifth child.

From the Back Cover

A self-satisfied couple intent on raising a happy family is shocked by the birth of an abnormal and brutal fifth child.

About the Author

Doris Lessing was born of British parents in Persia, in 1919, and moved with her family to Southern Rhodesia when she was five years old. She went to England in 1949 and has lived there ever since. She is the author of more than thirty books—novels, stories, reportage, poems, and plays. In 2007, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

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4 out of 54 out of 5
397 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

VICKI HERBERT
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
He was a Troll Only a Mother Could Love...
Reviewed in the United States on February 21, 2021
No spoilers. 5 stars. This is a story first published in 1988. It''s debatable whether it can be classified as horror or drama but either way it is well-written... David and Harriet Lovatt met at an office party. They shared a dream of having a large family...... See more
No spoilers. 5 stars. This is a story first published in 1988. It''s debatable whether it can be classified as horror or drama but either way it is well-written...

David and Harriet Lovatt met at an office party. They shared a dream of having a large family... eight children was their ultimate goal...

The couple bought a large three-story house and imagined it full of children and guests at holidays and during the summer...

Their first child, Luke, was born in 1966... then followed Helen, Jane and Paul...

The couple decided to slow down a bit before having their next child but despite their efforts, Harriet became pregnant with Ben...

... Ben tried to fiercely fight and kick his way out of the womb so Harriet had his birth induced at eight months...

Ben was odd... he looked like a troll or gnome and was violent toward the others in the household... he preferred keeping to himself...

...he could be quite dangerous... to both children and animals... they feared him and were wary of him...

Well meaning relatives talked the couple into having Ben institutionalized in a place where he was never expected to leave... instead he was expected to die there...

Harriet decided against the family''s wishes to visit Ben... she saw his horrendous living conditions and took him home with her...

Ben was different... he was a troll-like creature that only a mother could love...

This is a rather short novel written without chapter breaks. It was thought-provoking and readers will either like it or hate it for reasons I cannot elaborate on due to spoilers. I liked it and would compare it to THE CORMORANT by Stephen Gregory (another outstanding novel).
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CherylB
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The suburban dream..
Reviewed in the United States on February 15, 2021
(I should edit this but my head is angry today) A novella about a dream of family interrupted. Beautiful in its way...a demon child in the midst of the suburban dream. Simple and yet far from simple. Very much literature. The author is quite gifted, saying enough and... See more
(I should edit this but my head is angry today)
A novella about a dream of family interrupted. Beautiful in its way...a demon child in the midst of the suburban dream. Simple and yet far from simple. Very much literature. The author is quite gifted, saying enough and leaving enough unsaid.

Read for part of a challenge: "a book published when you were 10 years old" (I focused on the year I was actually 10 for all but 2.5 weeks vs the year I turned 10). I was drawn to it more than others on the lists of best novels from that year. The length helped for two reasons. First, if I''m picking a book to check a box vs picking a book first and then seeing if it fits (didn''t seem likely to hit this one organically) then short is a bonus, lower priority than content and the details in reviews. Second, I was glad it was short bc the description made me nervous about what I was getting myself into. I could probably read another from the year and use this for "a book you were afraid to to read".

Honestly, IMHO, it didn''t end up being scary, although it could inspire frightful trains of thought. It does peek in on lives built on joy then invaded by fear. Ben, the demon 5th child, is physically and functionally different. But he could stand in for a child who is emotionally distinct (e.g. families of serial killers and psychopaths...like some real examples of evil, Ben tortures and kills small animals...and esp terrifies the youngest of his older siblings). His mother is the protagonist and her -- I''m stuck on the right word, "torn-ness"(?)..."conflict" is right but feels imprecise -- between fear and mother-love is as central as in books like (my memory is hazy but just from the topic alone) We Need to Talk About Kevin. She cant let him be mistreated even if protecting one child puts four others (and a broader dream) at risk.

A side note: The author includes a child (mom''s niece) with Down''s Syndrome. It provides an interesting contrast ... a child who is different, physically and functionally, but most certainly not evil). The portrayal, which begins w pity and the child often being hidden to avoid discomfort, may be upsetting to some. The language isnt PC but probably true to life (as is someone calling out the language...which is interesting in that the language is deemed improper but trying to hide the difference is never debated). I''ve gone much longer than I planned but this character and the author''s choices here could be an interesting topic to unpack from so many different perspectives (literature, sociology, psychology, education)...as could the book a whole.

Recommended for lovers of literary literature (poorly phrased but I think those who qualify will know) ... it is a fairly easy and quick read but I think it will attract people who also read the stuff that teachers of literature assign without being "forced" ... especially those interested in sociology, the (dis)functioning of family units, motherhood (including the physical reality of growing and providing sustenance for another, eventually separate/other), how "normal" copes with "abnormal" (including (but,.as the prevalence paragraph notes, not limited to) the sort that might be evil)

Solid 4 stars. Maybe closer to 4.5
(Re the seller...arrived promptly and quality fit the description. Would certainly shop again. )
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Cathryn Conroy
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Horror Story That Plays With Your Psyche
Reviewed in the United States on June 16, 2015
This is a horror story. And it''s the most chilling, goosebump-inducing kind. There is no blood. No gore. No killers lurking in dark alleys with sharp knives at the ready. Oh no, none of that. This horror story by Doris Lessing plays with your psyche. David and... See more
This is a horror story. And it''s the most chilling, goosebump-inducing kind. There is no blood. No gore. No killers lurking in dark alleys with sharp knives at the ready. Oh no, none of that. This horror story by Doris Lessing plays with your psyche.

David and Harriet are incredibly happy. They marry for love. They both want a big family--eight or more kids! They get busy and produce four in quick succession. As the reality of caring for their lovely brood hits them hard, they decide to slow down, but get pregnant with No. 5 unexpectedly.

And the fifth child is...peculiar. Is he really human? Or is he a primitive man, some kind of throwback from an oddball gene? Ben''s birth disrupts this happy family and sends them on a downward spiral that is truly horrifying in its ramifications.

The sequel to Lessing''s "The Fifth Child" is "Ben, In the World," and I have snapped it up to keep reading the story. Both are short, fast reads.
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M. Gail Grant
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No Climactic Event
Reviewed in the United States on June 18, 2020
The concept of a literary horror had me really excited! I read Lessing’s novella-length rendition of The Fifth Child in one sitting and must admit, the tone had an eerie feeling. I gave this book two stars because it had me clinging to my seat in suspense, wondering if Ben... See more
The concept of a literary horror had me really excited! I read Lessing’s novella-length rendition of The Fifth Child in one sitting and must admit, the tone had an eerie feeling. I gave this book two stars because it had me clinging to my seat in suspense, wondering if Ben was going to murder a family member. Sadly, the rising action and feelings of intrigue and suspense never amounted to a climactic event. In other words, Lessing successfully captured the ambiance of a genre riddled with the sensations affiliated with light horror. Still, the rising action never developed into a literary plot or falling action. I closed the book feeling as though I was missing half the story. While Lessing is a very talented writer and crafter of a sensory experience, the story itself is very lacking in the basics of literary structure conventions. As a reader, I was invested in knowing more about Ben, but then the book ended.
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Noor Kamaluldeen
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great read!
Reviewed in the United States on February 22, 2021
This is a short novel, about 135 pgs, but what a disturbing read! I decided to read a genre out of my comfort zone and so I chose to read this one. This is not only a horror novel, it is a mother''s nightmare! A test of motherhood... it started out as a sweet story, a man... See more
This is a short novel, about 135 pgs, but what a disturbing read! I decided to read a genre out of my comfort zone and so I chose to read this one. This is not only a horror novel, it is a mother''s nightmare! A test of motherhood... it started out as a sweet story, a man falls in love with a woman both conservative and different from their peers at that time (I think it was the 1960''s). So they have the dream of having a big family and having 8 children... yes! EIGHT!
so they have four children in 6 years and then comes Ben, the fifth child, that shatters the dream and break the family beyond repair.

I really liked the novel... it is written straight to the point and in a way that made me feel uncomfortable. I can''t help but put myself in Harriet''s (the mother) shoes... and when I do, I can''t for the life of me know what to do! To give up on the child and lose herself in the process, her humanity, or to keep him and destroy her family and marriage. Both ways, she can''t win... it''s a lost cause.
I have so many thoughts on this one, I need to write them down before I move on to my next read.
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S. L. Dale
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A pretty good read
Reviewed in the United States on November 5, 2020
I guess I was expecting more horror, or at least more action. Instead, what we got is a heartfelt story about a woman who had to trade in her dream of a big happy family to protect her fifth son, an angry misfit who was unnaturally strong. Her central problem was that she... See more
I guess I was expecting more horror, or at least more action. Instead, what we got is a heartfelt story about a woman who had to trade in her dream of a big happy family to protect her fifth son, an angry misfit who was unnaturally strong. Her central problem was that she was a mom in every sense of the word; others didn''t understand why she wouldn''t give up on Ben. The book resolves like her personality - just sort of faded and inconclusive. Well written, just not for me.
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Linda Sue Richards
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
She should have stopped at four...
Reviewed in the United States on April 15, 2014
This book gave me the creeps. A friend told me it was science fiction - I prefer to think of it as a gothic horror story. A couple already have four seemingly perfect children. Mother gets pregnant again, and has lots of problems with the pregnancy: The baby is very active,... See more
This book gave me the creeps. A friend told me it was science fiction - I prefer to think of it as a gothic horror story. A couple already have four seemingly perfect children. Mother gets pregnant again, and has lots of problems with the pregnancy: The baby is very active, large, and she is constantly ill, can''t sleep, and is exhausted. Once born, mother cannot bond with the child, a boy they call Ben. He is a vicious nurser, and a very physically precocious child. However, his language skills are poor and he can''t relate to anyone. He doesn''t play with the other children, and is often aggressive. As he ages, there are lots of problems, some quite disturbing: He is physically unattractive. Eventually, it gets so bad they have to take him out of school. At one point, the family places Ben in an institution. The mother''s guilt is heart-breaking. It gets worse from there. Her eventual rescue of Ben is vivid, and the "home" is beyond words. Ben''s reappearance leads tragically to the disintegration of the family. What the mother eventually decides really took me by surprise - it''s almost shocking. Lessing''s writing style is compulsively readable and visual, even when the subject is uncomfortable, like this one.
3 people found this helpful
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C. Collins
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The master storyteller offers us a chilling parable
Reviewed in the United States on February 17, 2011
Once again Doris Lessing reveals that she is a master of storytelling. I really appreciate how she lets character develop as a result of action and circumstances. This is a disturbing novel but not really a horror story as some may have described it. It is the story of... See more
Once again Doris Lessing reveals that she is a master of storytelling. I really appreciate how she lets character develop as a result of action and circumstances. This is a disturbing novel but not really a horror story as some may have described it. It is the story of family and friends, the social fabric of life, and how the entry of something unexpected, challenging, dark and maybe even evil may unravel and tear that fabric. The unexpected may make some family members draw closer and others to draw away. This is the story of a large extended family with strong social bonds and family values are challenged by the birth of a child that is almost Neanderthal and certainly dangerous. A young married couple wishes to have a large family of 8 children and live in a large Victorian mansion but the dream becomes a nightmare when the fifth child is born and all bets are off and all relationships become ambiguous. I would love to see a good film-maker take this short novel and turn it into a motion picture. It is not supernatural, like Rosemary''s Baby, but is more subtle as it explores what we do and don''t know about those we love and are closest to us in our lives. When a child, such as Ben, enters a family, it is totally realistic to propose that one parent, the mother, is totally focused on this odd child while the other parent, the father, is more concerned with the well being of the other four older children. Both are noble instincts yet this clash of values may subtly undermine a marriage. On a larger scale, this very short novel (which can be read in 4 hours) is a parable about any unexpected life event that may tear the social fabric of our lives. Thus, the evil child Ben, could have been a proxy for mental illness, or domestic violence, or cancer, or a host of challenges that enter our lives and redefine us and pull us toward some loved ones and push us from others. This is an excellent book that is highly recommended.
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Top reviews from other countries

Pigwin
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Social Stigma.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 17, 2014
Harriet and David Lovatt meet and fall in love during the sexual revolution that took place in the 1960s but far from subscribing to the sexual mores of their generation they are conservative and espouse traditional family values. Their dream is to buy a large house in the...See more
Harriet and David Lovatt meet and fall in love during the sexual revolution that took place in the 1960s but far from subscribing to the sexual mores of their generation they are conservative and espouse traditional family values. Their dream is to buy a large house in the countryside and have lots of children. They get married and promptly set about achieving their goal purchasing the large country house courtesy of David''s Dad who provides the necessary finance. Having had four children in quick succession, Harriet is beginning to suffer the stress and strain of rearing four children with the added complication of money worries. There is also the fact that her parents and in-laws do not approve of her having so many children and especially having them so close together. Therefore Harriet is naturally dismayed to discover she is pregnant with her fifth child and when the pregnancy becomes increasingly painful and the growing baby unnaturally active, she is at the end of her tether and by the time the baby arrives she is convinced he/she will not be "normal". Baby Ben is an extremely large and unprepossessing infant being very hairy and having a neanderthal appearance. From birth he is difficult and seems to respond only to his own basic needs and fails to respond to others. As he grows things deteriorate even further and Ben becomes a danger, both emotionally and even physically, to his siblings which in turn places a huge strain on Harriet and David''s marriage and forces them to take steps. There are several developments in this novel which I will not go into as it is best left to the reader to make their own journey. This is a compelling and disturbing story and raises many questions, not least how society views and treats disability. Harriet never managed to find the support she so badly needed form the medical establishment; in fact, nobody who had contact with Ben i.e. doctors, teachers, family would admit that there was anything really wrong with him - apart from Harriet''s mother who helped to rear him. One part of the book is particularly difficult and depressing and that is when Ben is placed in an institution. Another thing that struck me as I read this book is that since Ben''s condition is never diagnosed or explained I felt at times he was a figure from science fiction. Yet the thread of a neanderthal runs through the narrative. There is also the chicken-and-egg aspect i.e. since Harriet was so appalled at being pregnant with Ben perhaps this was communicated in some way to the baby growing in her womb; this question also reared its head in Lionel Shriver''s We Need to Talk about Kevin. Disturbing this book may be but Doris Lessing is a gifted writer and the story held my undivided attention right to the final page.
9 people found this helpful
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Janie U
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thought provoking but not perfect
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 20, 2014
With relatively few words this author seems able to create images, emotions and sensations beyond expectations. This makes the process of reading enjoyable as you can immerse yourself into situations and places. The novel is set in a small town outside London, although I...See more
With relatively few words this author seems able to create images, emotions and sensations beyond expectations. This makes the process of reading enjoyable as you can immerse yourself into situations and places. The novel is set in a small town outside London, although I couldn''t get away from an American feel with the big house and family all around. There are many characters in the story some of which are drawn better than others. David and Harriet, the main characters, are developed to the point that they become acquaintances rather than friends, someone who you know but not well enough to understand. There seems to be a deliberate drawing of their marriage to place it as the opposite of the "greedy and selfish sixties". The warm family environment is created until the Fifth Child is conceived which turns everything in its head. The exploration of motherhood that the book encourages tackles difficult feelings between Harriet and all of her children. As her approach with Ben effects her relationship with everyone else around her. I couldn''t help but think about "We Need To Talk About Kevin" which tackles a similar subject but uses a different method of analysing. In this comparison, The Fifth Child does look old fashioned but it still a very valid read. There are times that Harriet and David''s attitude to Ben sounds very odd, bearing in mind it is the 1980s rather than medieval times. Within it''s just over 150 pages it covers a large time span. I really enjoyed the book but felt it could have been longer, during which time we would have found out more about some of the characters. I''ll console myself with reading the sequel. Also worth mentioning is that I loved the ending as it felt very real.
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Hayley
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Don''t waste your precious life monents on this.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 1, 2021
BBOOOORRRRRRRIIIIIINNNNNGGGGG! Spoiler alert..... Absolutely nothing happens. Literally nothing. Never find out why Ben is the way he is, what happens at the end..nothing. It is page upon page of the child''s mother staring at him and boring the reader to within an inch of...See more
BBOOOORRRRRRRIIIIIINNNNNGGGGG! Spoiler alert..... Absolutely nothing happens. Literally nothing. Never find out why Ben is the way he is, what happens at the end..nothing. It is page upon page of the child''s mother staring at him and boring the reader to within an inch of life trying to decide if her son is another species, we''re talking Goblin or alien here, absolutely ridiculous waste of time! Nothing happens at all. And in the kindle download version, 47% is this book and the rest is just 1st chapter samples of the author''s other books. I''m sorry I wasted any of my time, energy and breath on this, it was not worth it.
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Livia
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I just started reading Doris Lessing after I read her ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 30, 2014
I just started reading Doris Lessing after I read her obituary and realised I had never read her books before. I think this is now about my third or fourth book and it really intrigued me. I want to read it again so that I don''t make a fool of myself in how I interpreted...See more
I just started reading Doris Lessing after I read her obituary and realised I had never read her books before. I think this is now about my third or fourth book and it really intrigued me. I want to read it again so that I don''t make a fool of myself in how I interpreted it, but the issue of siblings and how the genes can throw out anything was very interesting. Also how one child and the parents reactions to it impact on the whole family and their friends, the unspoken feelings and reactions. The question of how society deals with this is also raised - especially in a society of to-day where every child is precious. Difficult to say more without being a spoiler. But it does tend to reinforce the feeling that overall the ''heir and a spare'' philosophy has a lot to be said for it, in these days of massive over population.
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S. B. Kelly
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Short and not at all sweet
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 6, 2014
No one ever accused Lessing of being an optimist or believing the best of humanity and this late novel is not for anyone feeling a bit low in spirits. A large, happy family is disrupted by the arrival of the fifth child, who seems to be some sort of throw-back to a...See more
No one ever accused Lessing of being an optimist or believing the best of humanity and this late novel is not for anyone feeling a bit low in spirits. A large, happy family is disrupted by the arrival of the fifth child, who seems to be some sort of throw-back to a pre-civilised era of the human race. The novel rushes on relentlessly, aided by the absence of chapters or even page breaks, despite the fact that it covers some 20 years in the life of its protagonists.
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